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Inside AI (Jul 3rd, 2019)

1. More companies are expected to use AI to manage their IT infrastructure. More data about networks and infrastructure, higher computing power, and more advanced algorithms have led the charge in so-called "self-driving" or "self-healing" IT. Some examples of companies using the tech include Adobe Inc., which developed an AI program using open-source technology that automates core IT tasks so employees don't have to do them, and Hitachi Vantara, a subsidiary of Hitachi Ltd., which uses AI to self-correct airflow and temperatures in data centers. - WSJ

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2. Baidu and Intel partnered together to work on Intel's Nervana Neural Network Processor for training AI. The NNP-T chip will be able to train neural networks for deep learning at scale. The companies aim to work cohesively on the software and hardware side to make sure the chip works with Baidu’s PaddlePaddle deep learning framework. At this year's CES, Intel’s also announced its NNP-I chip, which is specifically designed for inference. - TECHCRUNCH

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3. At least 20 of the 56 companies selected by the World Economic Forum as "Technology Pioneers" are using some kind of AI or machine learning. The startups chosen for this year's honor will be invited to forum events, where they typically have access to potential partners or investors and international policy makers. Some of the AI-centric firms include Bright Machines, which uses machine learning and computer vision in factory-based manufacturing, and Holmusk, a data science and digital health company that's working to build the largest real-world evidence platform. You can read the full list here. - VENTURE BEAT

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4. Scientists at the University of Technology Sydney developed a robot that uses AI and sound to map rooms. In a study published on the preprint server Arxiv.org, scientists outlined their approach, which used a speaker and a robot with a microphone that was tasked to follow a path-planning strategy. As the study's authors noted, the geometry of a room can play a large role in applications like mapping a 3D sound source in autonomous robotic systems, sound field reproduction, and indoor sound source localization. - VENTURE BEAT

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5. Researchers at Fudan University in Shanghai are working on a waterproof artificial synapse for pattern recognition in organic environments. A study published in the Royal Society of Chemistry's Nanoscale Horizons showed how the transparent flexible device mimics basic synaptic behaviors that would be found in humans, including long-term potentiation/depression (LTP/LTD), paired-pulse facilitation (PPF), and "learning-forgetting-relearning" processes. The device achieved an optical transmittance of ~87.5 percent in the visible light range. - PHYS.ORG

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6. Lagging behind beauty and apparel companies, the fragrance industry is finally beginning to experiment with using AI tech and algorithms to upgrade consumer experience. Swiss fragrance company Givaudan is using a robot that sends samples based on custom-selected notes, and in Germany, IBM tech is being used to develop custom fragrances. For more stories like this, check out our daily Inside Retail newsletter.

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7. A research scientist trained a neural network to develop spaceship names based on Iain M. Banks' "The Culture" sci-fi book series. Janelle Shane, the scientist behind the recently popular AI-generated cat names, trained OpenAI’s GPT-2 using 236 spaceship names from the Culture universe. Some of the favorites (as chosen by Futurism) include "Mini Cactus Cake Fight" and "Friendly Head Crusher." You can find more on Shane's website. - FUTURISM

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Written and curated by Beth Duckett in Orange County. Beth is a former reporter for The Arizona Republic who has written for USA Today, Get Out magazine and other publications. Follow her tweets about breaking news and other topics in southern California here.

Editing team: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside), David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology), and Bobby Cherry (senior editor at Inside, who’s always on social media).

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