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Inside AI (Jul 9th, 2019)

1. An AI-powered feature on Instagram can identify potentially offensive comments and ask users if they actually want to post them. The tool detects mean or harmful comments and sends an in-app pop-up notification asking, “are you sure you want to post this?” Early tests showed that some people do delete the negative comment instead of posting. Adam Mosseri, head of Instagram, wrote in a post that "it’s our responsibility to create a safe environment." - ABC NEWS

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2. Sony announced the Innovation Growth Fund that will raise $185 million to invest in late-stage tech startups. It first launched a fund to invest in high-growth industries in 2016, which made more than 40 investments in AI, augmented reality, IoT and robotics early-stage companies. The new fund will be run jointly with Diawa Capital Holdings and other investors include Mitsubishi UFJ Lease & Finance Company Ltd. and Sumimoto Mitsui Banking Corporation. A long-term goal is to have the portfolio companies, which are expected to include fintech as well as robotics and AI businesses, develop into public firms. - TECHCRUNCH

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3. Ericson Chan, CEO of Ping An Technology, says its AI systems could ease the long wait times and boost efficiency at China's hospitals. In China, only 8 percent of hospitals are triple-A grade, Chan explained during this week's RISE Conference in Hong Kong. “But that 8 percent of the hospitals are taking care of more than 50 percent of the patients of the whole nation,” he said. The company's AI systems can identify infectious diseases and predict the likelihood of a patient suffering from an illness before symptoms present themselves. The systems are more accurate and efficient than humans, he said. - CNBC

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4. A new AI-powered tool can detect spoilers in reviews of TV shows and books. The tool, called SpoilerNet, has an accuracy of 74 to 80 percent for TV shows, and 89 to 92 percent for book reviews. To train and test the system, researchers from UC San Diego created a new dataset using 1.3 million book reviews from Goodreads that had spoiler tags; they also ran a dataset of more than 16,000 single-sentence reviews of 880 TV shows. - PTI LOS ANGELES

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5. Researchers at the technical universities of Braunschweig and Munich developed an AI image-recognition system that can land planes on runways without human assistance. The tool, which is expected to improve flight safety, processes visual data about the runway and adjusts a plane's flight controls accordingly. In late May, the system was able to land a small plane carrying passengers at Diamond Aircraft airfield in Austria. - BBC

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6. Taiger, a Singapore-based AI firm, raised $25 million in a recent funding round, bringing its valuation to $110 million. The series B funding round was led by PacificBridge Asset Management and MCM Investment Partners. The company, whose clients include Bank of America and AIA Group Ltd.,  employs AI technology in large scale digital transformation projects. It plans to use the capital for a planned expansion. - BLOOMBERG

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7. An AI system from Duke Health can predict which patients are at risk of developing sepsis, a life-threatening condition caused by infections. The Durham, North Carolina-based healthcare network imputed a learning model with more than 50,000 patient records that included 32 million data points. The model reached accuracy levels for early sepsis detection above 90 percent. Cohere Med, a clinical analytics company, plans to improve the system with real-time processing of events. - BECKER'S

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8. Wyze used AI software to add cloud-based people detection to its security cameras. The Seattle-based startup will use a firmware update to add the feature to its Wyze Cam V2 and the Wyze Cam Pan, which are less expensive than Amazon's Cloud Cam or the Nest Cam IQ. The company tapped AI software from Xnor.ai, which is also based in Seattle. - THE VERGE

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9. The Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) hired BAE Systems to integrate machine learning into intelligence-gathering using radio frequency signals. The technology will be used to decipher the signals. - UPI

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10. A new infographic from Cyber Security Degrees explores the ethical considerations of AI. Some topics include how driverless cars should determine whose life to spare in accidents, and how facial recognition could be used to create fake videos of people to falsely convict them of crimes. - SOCIAL MEDIA TODAY

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Written and curated by Beth Duckett in Orange County. Beth is a former reporter for The Arizona Republic who has written for USA Today, Get Out magazine and other publications. Follow her tweets about breaking news and other topics in southern California here.

Editing team: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside), David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology), and Bobby Cherry (senior editor at Inside, who’s always on social media).

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