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Inside AI (Aug 19th, 2019)

1. A new, massively-sized computer chip from startup Cerebras could help companies build their AI more quickly and accelerate the industry as a whole. On Monday, the Silicon Valley firm unveiled the chip, which is about 100 times larger than your average chip, measuring roughly 9 inches on each side, and has 1.2 trillion transistors. Cerebras claims its the largest chip ever built. Notably, a chip this size has the potential to revolutionize AI as demands for intense computing power continue to grow. (OpenAI estimates that the amount of power used by the largest published AI experiments doubled every 3½ months from 2012 to 2018). Eugenio Culurciello, a chipmaker at Micron, notes that using Cerebras' chip "will be expensive, but some people will probably use it." - NYTIMES

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2. Engineer.ai CEO Sachin Dev Duggal has responded to complaints that the company exaggerated its AI abilities to attract customers and investors. In a new statement, Duggal denied the allegations and claimed that the mobile-app startup has historically preferred the term "human-assisted AI" rather than “automated software development." The rebuttal comes after The Wall Street Journal reported that Engineer.ai does not use AI to assemble code but relies on human engineers in India and elsewhere. Its chief business officer, who sued the startup earlier this year, claims Duggal “was telling investors that Engineer.ai was 80 percent done with developing a product that, in truth, he had barely even begun to develop.” Duggal claims his team never got a chance to explain the issues, even offering to meet with the WSJ six times, before the report came out. "Many of our answers, which dispelled several of the allegations, were excluded from the reporting," he wrote. - ENGINEER.AI

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3. A Netflix executive says the company is investing in AI technology that can automatically create TV and movie trailers. During an earnings call last month, chief product officer Gregory Peters said the AI can index scenes and characters "so that our trailer creators can really focus their time and energy on the creative process." The announcement comes after scientists at IBM Research collaborated with 20th Century Fox to create a promo spot for the horror film "Morgan." IBM's ML system Watson developed the trailer in 2016 by visually analyzing the movie to identify objects, characters, and scenery. - CBS NEWS

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4. Airbus is using AI - specifically, a system from AppZen - to review travel-and-expense reports, potentially saving the company millions of dollars. It takes Airbus employees about an hour to review the reports, sometimes more if there were missing receipts or receipts are in foreign languages. AppZen's system can recognize more than 100 languages and uses data about accepted vendors, expense types, and amounts to determine if the travel expenses are compliant. For example, because Airbus doesn't allow employees to expense alcohol on business trips if it’s not part of a meal, the AI can tell if an employee files a dinner expense from a bar that doesn’t serve food. Less than half of accounts-payable activity at companies globally is automated, a figure that's expected to rise to 80 percent by 2025. - WSJ

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5. The Pentagon isn't investing in AI technologies fast enough, according to a new report from Susanna Blume, director of the defense program at the Center for a New American Security. While the Department of Defense is making progress with AI, "it is, quite simply, still not moving fast enough," Blume writes. The Pentagon’s AI efforts requested $927 million of an overall proposed $718 billion topline budget, she notes. “Given the enormous implications of artificial intelligence for the future of warfare, it should be a far higher priority for DoD in the technology development space, and certainly a higher priority than the current No. 1 — development of hypersonic weapons." - NATIONAL DEFENSE

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6. Former Uber operations manager, Robbie Miller, says developers of autonomous vehicle technology are driving too many miles on public roads. As a result, he says, these companies are endangering motorists and pedestrians. During his tenure at Uber, Miller raised concerns about Uber’s self-driving system before a fatal crash that killed a pedestrian last year. However, one of Miller’s comments is a bit questionable, as he said the rate of crashes with autonomous vehicles is higher than human drivers. There is still very little centralized, fair data that can validate that statement. - AUTO NEWS

This story first appeared in Inside Auto.

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7. Beijing's Internet Court is using an AI judge whose movements are modeled after an actual person. Specifically, researchers created the virtual judge based on intelligent speech and image synthesizing; she doesn't actually issue rulings but can do "repetitive basic work," like litigation reception and online guidance, according to the court. Chinese courts have been using AI assistance since January. - RADII

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8. A new A.T. Kearney survey found that 39 percent of executives polled believe China will overtake the U.S. to become the world's AI leader. The global management consulting firm surveyed nearly 450 senior executives from large corporations in 23 countries. Of those, half of them chose AI/ML as their top opportunity for tech adoption, up from 27 percent last year. Increased cybersecurity risks were chosen as the top operational challenge for their firms. - AT KEARNEY

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9. Baidu launched its Artificial Intelligence cloud that will provide services to Singapore-based financial firms, China's internet, and the online gaming industry. Its first customers in Singapore include the video streaming site iQiyi and Do Global. - DATA-ECONOMY

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10. Only a week remains to check out an AI-centric art exhibition at London's Barbican Centre. "AI: More than Human" includes new art projects and commission by scientists, researchers, and artists including Stephanie Dinkins, Joy Buolamwini, and Mario Klingemann. The exhibition covers everything from AI's ancient roots in Japanese Shintoism to Ada Lovelace and Charles Babbage’s early computing experiments and Alphabet's Deepmind. Its last day is Monday, Aug. 26. - FORBES

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Written and curated by Beth Duckett in Orange County. Beth is a former reporter for The Arizona Republic who has written for USA Today, Get Out magazine and other publications. Follow her tweets about breaking news and other topics in southern California here.

Editor: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside).

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