Inside | Real news, curated by real humans
Inside Automotive

Inside Automotive (Aug 9th, 2019)

1. Uber announced its Q2 financial results on Thursday, posting its largest-ever loss of $5 billion as well as its slowest-ever revenue growth. The company lost $4.72 per share versus the $3.12 expected by analysts. Revenue sat at $3.17 billion for the quarter, versus an analyst-expected $3.36 billion. The majority of the $5.2 billion loss — $3.9 billion — was caused by stock-based compensation the company had to pay out to its employees after Uber’s IPO. Revenue grew 14 percent from a year ago, which is the slowest quarterly growth ever disclosed by the company. — NYT

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

2. After buying regulatory credits from Tesla, Fiat Chrysler Automobiles said it will comply with 2019 and 2020 emissions targets and will not pay any fines. The automaker said it will be compliant after the credits purchase, the launch of more-efficient combustion engines, and the addition of plug-in and electric vehicles to its lineup. FCA CEO Mike Manley said electric vehicles will count for about 5 percent of FCA’s European sales. — AUTO NEWS EUROPE

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

3. Follow Friday: Jill Ciminillo

With so many cars debuting on the market every year, it’s hard to keep track of what’s new (or neat) about so many vehicles. Luckily, you can follow Jill Ciminillo’s Twitter account. 

Jill Ciminillo (jillciminillo) is the automotive editor for Auto Matters, curating the auto reviews and news for Sinclair Broadcasting Group’s 80 local news websites. She does comprehensive reviews for new vehicles that often appear on the network, and did some great ones for the 2020 Subaru Outback and 2020 Hyundai Palisade. She also did this awesome piece on how to protect yourself from being carjacked, reflecting on a personal experience that occurred to her last year. 

You can follow Jill here

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

4. Tesla CEO Elon Musk has tweeted more details on how the automaker’s full self-driving pricing would increase. He said that costs for the feature would probably increase every two to four months, “depending on how much progress we make.” On August 16, the automaker will increase the price of the feature by another $1,000. The feature currently costs about $6,000. —@ELONMUSK/TWITTER

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

5. Indian automaker Mahindra plans to build a $1 billion plant in Flint, Michigan. The automaker, which currently produces the off-road Roxor vehicle in a plant in Auburn Hills, Michigan, said it is out of capacity at its current U.S. facility and hopes to bring more of its commercial offerings to the U.S. market. It is unclear which products will land in the U.S., but the automaker is placing a bid on a $6 billion contract to build next-generation vehicles for the U.S. Postal Service. — CRAINS DETROIT BUSINESS

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

6. Tesla is facing a class-action lawsuit from a driver who saw his range slashed by a software update. David Rasmussen, who is leading the lawsuit, filed the complaint against the automaker in Northern California court, after experiencing an 11 percent drop in range with his 2014 Tesla Model S. Rasmussen had been plotting the battery capacity degradation of his Model S for the past 100,000 miles, saying the range drop occurred after Tesla’s 2019.16.1 and 2019.16.2 software updates. — ELECTREK

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

7. A top official of the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), Heidi King, is expected to leave her position. King serves as the deputy administrator of the NHTSA and has played a role in the Trump Administration’s effort to roll back Obama-era vehicle emissions rules. She is expected to leave the agency within the next few weeks. — REUTERS

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

9. A joint venture between BMW and Great Wall Motors to produce low cost electric vehicles faces regulatory uncertainties. Since 2018, both automakers have worked on creating a joint platform that BMW would use to produce Mini vehicles in the country and that Great Wall would use for its own brand. But the automakers have yet to receive permission to build the plant in Changsu, amid tightened regulations on adding manufacturing capacity. — REUTERS

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

10. Clarification on Wednesday’s #JargonWatch 

Some of you wrote in to give feedback about Wednesday’s #JargonWatch feature, asking questions about the purpose of the column. The feedback included concerns that I was intentionally spreading negative publicity for electric vehicles. 

The #JargonWatch item was merely intended to reference how slow Level 1 charging is, and how some drivers (who may not have the resources or infrastructure to install a Level 2 charger) may use the terms "top-off charging" and "en-route charging." 

Some said that Level 1 charging is virtually “non-existent” since “most Tesla drivers have Level 2 chargers at home.” There is no data available to show what percentage of Tesla/EV drivers use Level 2 over Level 1, so we cannot say that a vast majority of EV/Tesla drivers have a 240V receptacle. The piece was not intended as a news item on the different levels or charging solutions available, but about the common use of the two terms as a part of our "#JargonWatch" feature. 

Hope you all have a great weekend! 

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

This newsletter was written and curated by Johan Moreno. Johan is based out of Los Angeles, CA and has covered technology and automotive extensively for a variety of publications, including Forbes and The Orange County Register. Follow him on Twitter @dudejohan

Editor: David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology).

  • Email gray

Subscribe to Inside Automotive