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Inside Cannabis

Inside Cannabis (Aug 16th, 2019)

Hey Inside Cannabis readers,

We''re updating our Top 100 Cannabis list of the best people who tweet about the cannabis industry. So we're looking for you to share with us the best people who tweet about the cannabis world. Hit reply or tweet us at @inside_cannabis!

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1. The National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) released an extensive list of cannabis-related research objectives it hopes to fund. In the notice, NIDA made clear that cannabis policies in the U.S. and globally are “far outpacing the knowledge needed to determine and minimize the public health impacts of these changes." The organization listed 13 areas of research they consider important. Some of these include developing standards for measuring cannabis dose, intoxication, and impairment, examining the reasons for initiation and continued use of cannabis for therapeutic purposes, and identifying the effects of cannabis on pregnant women. – MARIJUANA MOMENT

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2. An executive with Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has warned CBD producers that the agency is unlikely to approve over-the-counter use of the drug until more research is done. Lowell Schiller, a principal associate commissioner for policy with the FDA, told the National Industrial Hemp Council that the FDA plans to treat CBD like any other new ingredient going into foods or drugs. “We don’t hold a grudge against (cannabinoids), but we also don’t hold them to a lower standard of safety or absolve them of other requirements,” he said. “Consumers have a right to expect the same level of FDA protection with respect to hemp and derivatives like CBD as they would expect with respect to any other substance.” The problem, however, is that cannabis research has been hampered by federal prohibition decades. – HEMP INDUSTRY DAILY

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3. Follow Friday: Zoe Wilder. Zoe Wilder is, above all, a woman in weed. A media relations professional and business consultant orbiting the cannabis industry, she seems to show up everywhere, whether the opening of the Museum of Weed or on the pages of any weed-related magazine on the market.

While she works with brands to develop and execute inventive promotional content and campaigns, her work in the weed industry also goes deeper than that, including "advancing the conversation through science-based research and education" as well as putting social justice at the core of her mission.

Beyond that, she's the person to follow on both Twitter and Instagram if you want to keep up-to-date on the latest cannabis news and lifestyle happenings. 

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4. Legal cannabis could become a $60 billion market in the U.S. if federal prohibition is repealed, according to a new report. There are approximately 24 million users of both legal and illegal cannabis in the U.S. todau, according data from market-research firm Euromonitor, a number that could jump to 30 million as cannabis products continue to enter the mainstream. With that in mind, investment firm Echelon Wealth Partners estimates that market could balloon to $60 billion, or more than double the total market for vitamins and supplements in the U.S. – BUSINESS INSIDER

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5. Thirty female state lawmakers from across the country are convening in Denver for a policy summit on cannabis issues this week. The National Foundation for Women Legislators (NFWL) is hosting the Marijuana Policy Summit to discuss the evolution of cannabis laws, licensing and tax structures in the industry, the science of cannabis, and public health and safety concerns, among other topics. Participants will also tour a cannabis dispensary. – MARIJUANA MOMENT

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6. Advocates for medical and recreational cannabis in Texas are accusing the state of hypocritical behavior for opposing reforms to cannabis policy while profiting off the industry. Texas has one of the most restrictive medical cannabis programs in the country and recreational cannabis has never received a public hearing. At the same time, the state’s Permanent School Fund Committee has an investment now worth more than $700,000 in a public company that owns and leases land to cannabis businesses in 12 states. Advocates want to see those investments made in Texas. – TEXAS PUBLIC RADIO

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7. Patients in the U.K. are turning to private clinics to obtain medical cannabis. Medical cannabis was legalized in the U.K. in late 2018 for severe forms of epilepsy and a limited list of other disorders. However, very few prescriptions for medical cannabis have been issued by doctors in the country, and patients dependent upon the medication are growing frustrated with the lack of access. This has led to the introduction of private clinics, which can prescribe cannabis to patients. – BBC

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8. Maryland highest court ruled this week that the smell of cannabis is not enough justification for law enforcement to search a person. The state is the latest to rule that cops can't use smell alone as probable cause for a crime, joining Massachusetts, Pennsylvania and a county in Georgia, which all made the same decision earlier this week. The court used a lyric from Bob Dylan's song “The Times They Are a-Changin" to punctuate their decision. – THE BALTIMORE SUN

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9. Nearly three dozen young people have been hospitalized around the country in recent weeks for severe respiratory problems after vaping either nicotine or cannabis. Most of the patients were having difficulty breathing when they arrived at the hospital and some patients reported chest pain, vomiting and other ailments. The Illinois, Minnesota and Wisconsin public health departments are investigating these cases, which have stumped doctors. – NYT

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10. A new startup is attempting to develop a weed breathalyzer to help police detect cannabis impairment levels. The breathalyzer, designed by Canadian company’s SannTek 315, is designed to test for alcohol, along with measuring the level of cannabis breath molecules based on consumption in the prior few hours. However, accurately measuring impairment levels has problematic by other companies that have jumped into the space. – OBSERVER

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Tessa Love is a Berlin-based freelance writer hailing from California's weed country. In addition to writing and curating Inside Cannabis, Tessa has written about cannabis, culture, and tech for the BBC, The Outline, Racked, Slate, The Establishment and more. Find her on twitter at @tessamlove.

Editor: Bobby Cherry (senior editor at Inside, who’s always on social media).

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