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Inside Cloud (Sep 11th, 2019)

1. The Mayo Clinic has chosen Google’s cloud platform to digitize and improve its healthcare delivery. Financial terms of the 10-year deal were not disclosed, but Google plans to open a new office in Rochester, Minnesota where the Mayo Clinic is based, so its engineers can work closely with Mayo researchers, doctors, and data scientists. The agreement reflects a growing trend in healthcare; Microsoft, IBM, and Adobe have formed partnerships with big healthcare providers and health insurers and a recent report forecast the global predictive healthcare analytics market alone to climb to nearly $8 billion by 2025.STAR TRIBUNE

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2. The software developer, Perspecta Enterprise Solutions filed a grievance Monday with the Government Accountability Office over the bidding process that resulted in the Aug. 29 award of the Defense Enterprise Office Solutions program to General Dynamics.  The 10-year contract was initially valued at $7.5 billion, but in its complaint, Perspecta says it could be worth as much as $12 billion. It is unrelated to the Pentagon’s JEDI contract, which also centers on cloud computing services, and is under review by the Department of Defense following allegations that the bidding process was rigged to favor Amazon CEO Jeff Bezos. The Government Accountability Office has until Dec. 18 to make a decision on the complaint.  FEDERAL NEWS NETWORK

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3. For most of 2019, the stock prices of cloud software companies have been soaring, until last week when something shifted. In the past five trading days, a wide-range of the cloud king stocks have begun to slip from their thrones, causing some investors and financial media to wonder if September is the cloud industry’s Icarus moment, when it fluttered its wings too close to the sun, and got burned. One investment advisor told the Financial Times that cloud stocks were overvalued, redolent of the irrational exuberance that drove the real estate market more than a decade ago: “These companies share a common goal; a business model based on scaling fast at all costs to achieve first-mover advantage and perceived dominance and pricing power — a model of high investment, breakneck speed of revenue growth that (hopefully) will eventually generate significant cash flow and operating leverage.”FINANCIAL TIMES

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4. The $130 billion cloud vendor Salesforce is rolling out an international advertising campaign this week that is intended to provide corporate executives and entrepreneurs with a clearer picture of how the company can help expand their business. Chief Marketing Officer Stephanie Buscemi said that while Salesforce has brand recognition . . . “when you get into the ‘what we do,’ we have further work to do there.” The goal of the campaign is to really focus on talking about what our products do for our customers.” Initially focused on providing cloud-based marketing and sales tools, Salesforce of late has been on an acquisition binge. Last month, Salesforce closed the $15.3 billion acquisition of Tableau, its biggest deal ever, to push into data visualization tools. The followed the $6.5 billion purchase of MuleSoft in 2018 to help Salesforce develop its data integration software.CNBC

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5. When she started her job as Baylor University’s chief human resources officer in 2014, Cheryl Gochis was immediately confronted with the primitiveness of the IT infrastructure. There were separate systems for recruiting, learning system, and HR requiring staff to constantly re-enter the same piece of information. Said Gochis: “The system stole our joy.” So the university administrators decided to get their mojo back by launching “Project Ignite,” which resulted in migrating their HR and finance processes and data to Oracle’s cloud platform. FORBES

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6. Amazon Web Services and a regional consortium of Bay Area community colleges, K through 12 public schools and California State University partners on Tuesday announced an effort to train students for careers in cloud computing. The regional consortium will offer a Cloud Computing Certificate similar to one offered in the greater Los Angeles area. Silicon Valley is grappling with a labor force that is lacking in sought-after tech skills such as cloud computing and artificial intelligence. "Preparing students for livable, 21st-century jobs in growing industries is one of our many important goals as a community college," said Dr. Mark Rocha, Chancellor at City College of San Francisco, a member of the consortium.PATCH

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7. The Indian city of Bangalore plans to complete the migration of all municipal government data to the cloud by November. Data from 2002 onwards are currently being uploaded to the cloud. The move is envisioned as a cost-cutting measure –with the data from more than 250 government offices relocated to 75 data centers– but is also intended to reduce long lines and wait times in India’s fifth-largest city with a population of 8.5 million people. Bangalore, which produces as many as 50,000 documents per day, is widely regarded as the center of India’s growing technology industry.TIMES OF INDIA

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8. Nearly 85 percent of all enterprises operate across multiple clouds yet the Pentagon’s Joint Enterprise Defense Infrastructure, or JEDI, cloud program will migrate about 80% of all Department of Defense data to a single cloud. That, according to some critics, represents a security risk because it gives hackers a single point of entry to target in an attack on the Pentagon’s IT infrastructure. “No business in the world would build a cloud the way JEDI would and then lock into it for a decade,” Sam Gordy, general manager of IBM U.S. Federal, wrote in a blog post. “JEDI turns its back on the preferences of Congress and the administration is a bad use of taxpayer dollars, and was written with just one company in mind. America’s warfighters deserve better.” The Pentagon inspector general is investigating potential “misconduct” related to the JEDI contracting process; Amazon Web Services and Microsoft Azure remain the frontrunners. — SDX CENTRAL

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9. The global communications firm Viasat Monday announced its plans for a new business internet service which will offer direct cloud connections to Microsoft Azure’s cloud platform. Viasat Direct Cloud Connect is expected to launch sometime before the year’s end, and it will a secure, dedicated network connection to Azure via Azure ExpressRoute which is a high-speed, low-latency, private link between a customer's on-site IT infrastructure, or colocation facility and data stored on Azure cloud data servers. MONEY CONTROL NEWS

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10. Infosys and Microsoft on Monday announced a strategic partnership to help migrate date from the Philipines-based conglomerate, JG Summit Holdings, Inc, to the cloud. Infosys will deploy its technology to build, adapt and manage Microsoft’s hybrid cloud platform, Azure. JG Summit’s business interests include air transportation, banking, food manufacturing, hotels, petrochemicals, power generation, publishing, real estate and telecommunications.BUSINESS STANDARD

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Jon Jeter has worked in journalism for nearly 25 years. He is the author of a book on global finance, and co-author of a book on American politics.

Editor: David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology).

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