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Inside Cycling (Sep 4th, 2019)

1. The National Park Service now allows e-bikes on park trails. The new policy says park visitors will be allowed to use e-bikes on paved roads, trails, areas meant for off-road motor vehicle use and more. The policy is limited to e-bikes with 750 watts and riders are encouraged to check with specific parks about the new policy before riding. One of the ideas behind the policy is to make the national parks more accessible for those who might not have the physical ability to ride a traditional bike. Another big benefit is that e-bikes have a smaller environmental impact than gas vehicles. — BICYCLING

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2. A driver killed a Brooklyn cyclist after the cyclist allegedly broke into his vehicle. The cyclist was 47 years old and riding in Bushwick early Monday morning. A 41-year-old driver named Korey Johnson said he saw the cyclist “fiddling with cars” on the block; the driver thought his SUV had been broken into earlier, so he confronted the cyclist. The two began to argue and the cyclist pedaled away. The driver went after him in his car and crushed the cyclist against a line of vehicles; the bike ripped in half and the driver’s SUV flipped over. The cyclist was taken to Woodhull Hospital and died. The driver is in custody and has been charged with murder and manslaughter. An NYPD spokesperson could not confirm whether the cyclist was breaking into cars, but the matter is under investigation. — GOTHAMIST

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3. By the Numbers: In one survey, half of the participants felt pro cycling is too predictable. The UCI recently conducted an informal online fan survey inviting cycling fans to share their opinions. About 22,300 fans from 134 countries participated. According to the survey, 62 percent of the respondees actively ride bikes, while 27 percent race and 21 percent commute via bike. According to results, 70 percent felt pro bike racing is easy to understand, and two-thirds thought the rules are not too complicated; half of the survey participants said racing is too predictable. — VELONEWS

Do you feel that pro cycling is too predictable? Hit reply to share your thoughts.

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4. A new app might help to keep bike lanes free from parked vehicles. An app called Safe Lanes lets you take a photo of a vehicle blocking a bike lane; the app will read the vehicle’s license plate and submit a complaint form, map included, to the non-emergency 311 service. Ideally, city officials would quickly tow the vehicle. The app takes its cue from technology like Amazon’s Ring doorbells, which provide video surveillance. But the app might not be all it’s cracked up to be. The license plate images will live online forever and could lead to unfair convictions or even be a way for ICE to identify undocumented immigrants. — CITY LAB

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5. A University of Washington professor rode his bike across the state in support of student scholarships. Dan Schmidt has been teaching kinesiology at UW Oshkosh for 22 years and wanted to build a scholarship fund for kinesiology students, so he rode 150 miles in just two days, making a triumphant entrance at Opening Day on Tuesday. The school has not yet announced how much money he raised. — UW OSHKOSH TODAY

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6. The mental strength you gain from cycling can be used in life, too. Work to understand how you respond under pressure; then you can shift your mindset before a big race or a big life event. Training your mind is equally as important as training your body, so commit to staying in control of your thoughts. — MAXIM

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7. An Ohio man is riding in ultra-distance events to raise money for injured veterans. Doug Chivington, 59, from Bellefontaine, near Columbus, was inspired by his son, who was in Iraq with the Army and sustained a traumatic brain injury. Now Chivington rides in ultra-distance cycling events to raise awareness and money for a group named Resurrecting Lives Foundation, aiming for $50,000 next year. — THE COLUMBUS DISPATCH

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8. Chad Peterson, COO of mountain bike company Intense, died in a bike accident. Peterson was riding on Ortega Highway in California on Monday when the accident occurred. Peterson has been an integral part of the cycling community for many years, working for companies like Cannondale and Crank Brothers and riding 20+ hours a week himself. — PINKBIKE

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9. Wahoo Fitness announced a new KICKR indoor training bike. The KICKR Bike has an adjustable aluminum frame and uses standard bike parts so you can choose whichever handlebar, stem and saddle you want. An app helps you adjust the bike fit. The bike costs $3,500 and will be available in October. — CYCLINGTIPS

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10. A Ghana-based company is making bamboo bikes. Creating bikes from bamboo instead of metal requires less electricity and less hazardous chemicals; it also helps cut carbon emissions. Ghana Bamboo Bikes seeks to give locals the skills to make a living from the plentiful bamboo that grows in the country. — YOUTUBE

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Inside Cycling is written and curated by Hailey Hudson, an Atlanta freelance writer with a love for all things fitness and sports. Hailey performs an equal mix of journalism and content marketing services for clients such as Sitejabber, Barnes & Noble Education and FloSports. In her spare time, she writes YA novels, tap dances and snuggles with her beagle puppy Sophie. Follow her on Instagram @haileyh412.

Editor: Bobby Cherry (senior editor at Inside, who’s always on social media).

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