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Inside Daily Brief (Nov 29th, 2017)

Minnesota Public Radio (MPR) has fired Garrison Keillor, former host of "A Prairie Home Companion," over alleged improper behavior. MPR and Keillor did not provide details of the allegation on Wednesday. Keillor told the Associated Press that he was fired over a story he believes "is more interesting and more complicated than the version MPR heard." The NPR member station has hired a law firm to investigate the allegations it learned about in October. The firing comes after Keillor wrote an op-ed for the Washington Post, published on Tuesday, in which he defended Senator Al Franken, who several women have accused of improper behavior. Keillor, 75, created and hosted "A Prairie Home" from 1974 to 2016. New episodes of the widely distributed variety show, with a new host, will be renamed. MPR also said that it will stop distribution of another Keillor show, "The Writer's Almanac." - AP

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A Bosnian Croat general convicted of war crimes reportedly died after drinking poison in a U.N. courtroom. “I am not a war criminal. I oppose this conviction," former commander Slobodan Praljak said before drinking a vial believed to be poison. A judge has just upheld his 20-year prison sentence. Paramedics rushed into the courtroom but Praljik died shortly after in a hospital in the Hague, Netherlands, state TV reported. Praljak was convicted over his involvement in an effort to drive out Muslims from Bosnia in the 1990s. Judges from the International Criminal Tribunal for the Former Yugoslavia delivered rulings on Wednesday to former political and military leaders involved in the Bosnian conflict. The hearings have since been suspended. - NYT

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Warner Bros. fired Andrew Kreisberg, the producer of "Supergirl," after an internal investigation revealed claims of sexual misconduct against him. The claims involve multiple women, Variety reported. Kreisberg was terminated from four series he was working on - Supergirl, Legends of Tomorrow, The Flash, and Arrow - as well as CW Seed's "Vixen." Kreisberg has denied prior charges of inappropriate massages or touching, but told Variety: “I have made comments on women’s appearances and clothes in my capacity as an executive producer, but they were not sexualized.” On Wednesday, Variety also published a more detailed report of allegations against Matt Lauer, co-host of NBC’s “Today.” The claims said that Lauer gave a sex toy to a coworker as a gift and “included an explicit note about how he wanted to use it on her.” It also said that he exposed his penis to another female worker and reprimanded her when she declined to engage in a sex act. “He would sometimes quiz female producers about who they’d slept with, offering to trade names,” Variety reported. - VARIETY

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ESPN will lay off approximately 150 employees, its president announced on Wednesday. In a memo to employees, John Skipper said the job cuts mostly impact workers behind the scenes in digital content, studio production and technology. The cuts "generally reflect decisions to do less in certain instances and re-direct resources,” he wrote. It is the network's third round of layoffs since October 2015, when 300 jobs were eliminated. Another 100 workers, including on-air talent, were let go in April. ESPN has lost millions of dollars in revenue as fewer people subscribe to cable TV packages with its networks. Because the company contracts for programming, it is forced to save money through staff reductions. - WAPO

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The U.S. Supreme Court heard arguments on Wednesday in a case involving privacy in the digital age. The ruling could determine if police must have warrants to obtain cellphone data from wireless providers that shows the location of suspects. The case involves Timothy Carpenter, who is serving 116 years in prison for a string of armed robberies in Ohio and Michigan. Police obtained cellphone tower information without a court-ordered warrant that placed Carpenter in the areas where the crimes occurred. In a hearing Wednesday, five justices appeared to consider extending the constitutional protections that prevent “unreasonable searches” for police to obtain the cellphone tower data. "Most Americans, I think, still want to avoid Big Brother," Justice Sonia Sotomayor said. Out of the four largest wireless carriers, only Verizon told the court that it supports strong privacy protections for users. - CNN

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Donald Trump Jr. will meet with the U.S. House of Representatives Intelligence Committee on December 6. Citing unnamed sources with knowledge of the issue, CNN reported that lawmakers are expected to question Trump's eldest son over his contacts with Russia, including a meeting at Trump Tower with campaign officials and a Russian attorney. The House and Senate Intelligence Committees have interviewed several people who attended the June 2016 meeting. “Obviously, when Donald Trump Jr. comes before the committee there are innumerable areas that we’re going to be interested in. It’s hard to find a more central figure in this,” Representative Adam Schiff, the panel's top Democrat, said. - CNN

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A gunman who opened fire from a high-rise condominium in Reno on Tuesday was killed by police. One woman was injured in the hand after the unidentified shooter opened fire from the eighth floor of the luxury Montage complex. Police shut down the area and raided the gunman's room before shooting him fatally. The downtown apartment complex is also where Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock owned a unit before selling it in late 2016, the Associated Press reported. On October 1, Paddock killed 58 people and injured more than 500 in the deadliest mass shooting in modern U.S. history. - AP

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Archaeologists have found what they believe is the first physical evidence of the Julius Caeser-led invasion of Britain in 55 B.C. A defensive ditch discovered near Ebbsfleet on Pegwell Bay in Kent, England, is believed to be the location where the Romans landed, according to a University of Leicester team. The location of the ditch, which was part of a larger fort, coincides with Caeser’s personal account of the invasion. The bay location is also one of the few that could have harbored Caesar's fleet of 800 ships. At the scene, archaeologists found pottery, animal bones and iron weapons, including a Roman javelin, as further proof. “This is only one bit in a much bigger project, looking at Julius Caesar’s invasion of Britain as a whole," a research associate at the university said. - NEWSWEEK

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Anthony Scaramucci resigned from his post on an advisory board at Tufts University. The former White House communications director had threatened to sue a student newspaper after it published op-eds criticizing him. On Tuesday, Scaramucci stepped down from the board of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy. “It’s a school of law and diplomacy. I thought it was a diplomatic thing to do to bow out," he said. The American Civil Liberties Union is now representing the student who wrote the columns earlier this month calling for Scaramucci's resignation. The ACLU argues that the op-eds are a form of constitutionally protected speech. - NYTIMES

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Thousands of American Airlines' flights do not have pilots assigned to them for the upcoming holiday season. A glitch in the company's scheduling system allowed too many pilots to take vacation in the latter part of December. More than 15,000 flights lack pilot assignments during that time, Reuters reported. The airline is offering 150 percent of hourly pay to pilots who fill in, although the airline union said that the proposed solution violates their contract. "[N]either APA nor the contract can guarantee the promised payment of the premium being offered,” the union said. - FORTUNE

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