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Inside Daily Brief

Inside Daily Brief (Sep 4th, 2019)

1. 🌀 More than 2 million residents along the southeast coast have been warned to evacuate as Hurricane Dorian churns toward Florida, Georgia and the Carolinas. The Category 2 storm is expected to graze Florida before moving north later in the week. The National Hurricane Center said that regardless of the storm's path, a "life-threatening" storm surge and "dangerous winds" will threaten eastern portions of the coast. Dorian devastated the Bahamas after stalling over the island nation for two days. Seven people have been reported dead, but the death toll is expected to rise as floodwaters recede. - CBS NEWS

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2. 💰 Pentagon officials on Tuesday announced they will reallocate $3.6 billion from more than 120 military construction projects to fund President Trump’s border wall. The money will subsidize 11 projects and 175 miles of a new or improved barrier that, they say, should help reduce the number of military troops stationed at the border. The Pentagon has not yet disclosed which projects will be defunded. On Tuesday, House Speaker Nancy Pelosi denounced the administration’s “irresponsible decision to transfer funds from appropriated U.S. military construction,” which she said “makes America less safe and dishonors the Constitution.” - WASHINGTON POST

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3. ⚖️ An El Paso family is suing Walmart for the lack of security during the Aug. 3 mass shooting. Jessica and Guillermo Garcia were at Walmart with their two children when a gunman opened fire, killing 22 people and injuring dozens more. In their lawsuit, they claim Walmart failed its duty to protect its shoppers by not providing adequate guards to survey the store. Walmart released a statement on Tuesday saying, in part, that “safety is a top priority” and that they’ve “preserved what information we have, and we’ve worked meticulously with federal and local authorities.” - KFOX14

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4. Hong Kong leader Carrie Lam on Wednesday announced she would meet one of the demands put forth by protestors: withdrawal of a controversial extradition bill. The proposed piece of legislation would’ve allowed people in Hong Kong to be extradited to China for legal proceedings. Other demands demonstrators still have include an independent investigation into Hong Kong police's use of force and that all charges be dropped against anti-extradition protestors. The Hang Seng index rose sharply following Lam's announcement. For months, activists have staged demonstrations in the streets of Hong Kong. - CNBC

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5. 🏫 On Tuesday, some University of Southern California admissions-office emails were made public in court, demonstrating that children of potential donors were highlighted in the application process. Some of the admissions candidates, dubbed “special interest” applicants, had descriptive notes next to their names, including “25,000 check and more later” and “1 mil pledge.” A USC spokesperson did not deny that some prospective matriculants can be flagged by officials, but said that only admissions counselors decide who is admitted to USC. - LA TIMES

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6. U.S. Vice President Mike Pence on Tuesday said staying at a Trump property in Ireland was a “logical” choice because it accommodated for their security detail. Pence spent Monday and Tuesday nights at Trump International Golf Links & Hotel in Doonbeg, a small coastal town in southwest Ireland. Critics said the stay benefited Trump at U.S. taxpayers’ expense. A spokesperson for Pence said that Trump “suggested” the property. On Tuesday afternoon, Pence tweeted a thank-you message to the people of Ireland for a “great visit.” - AP

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7. A scientist for San Diego County is warning that a dangerous non-native species of mosquito is proliferating across San Diego. They are hazardous because they can transmit the Zika or dengue virus, although no ailments have been reported. The most common, known colloquially as the yellow fever mosquito, was a nuisance in parts of Florida until the Asian tiger mosquito population grew there in the late 1980s. Last month, San Diego County Vector Control Program made aerial larvicide drops over the region, but locals are advised to do their part by eliminating standing bodies of water from their properties.  - KNSD

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8. A 5-year-old boy who was thrown from a third-floor balcony at the Mall of America in April is back home after more than four months of hospital care. The child, Landen Hoffman, fell 40 feet and suffered a head trauma and broken bones. Hoffman's mother told police that Emmanuel Aranda approached them at random on April 12 before picking up her son and tossing him over the railing. The family on Tuesday released a statement on a GoFundMe page set up for Landen, which has raised more than $1 million: “Thank you to all of you who prayed for us and loved us during the past 4 ½ months. You helped to give us hope.” Aranda is currently serving a 19-year sentence. - KARE

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9. An American woman was arrested in the Philippines on Wednesday after police said they found a 6-day-old baby in her carry-on luggage. Authorities said the woman did not have any documentation for the child, although she claims to be the baby’s aunt. The child's name and condition had not been confirmed Wednesday morning. The incident took place in Manila’s Ninoy Aquino International Airport, and the case has been handed over to an anti-human trafficking police unit in the Philippines. - CNN

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10. 🍖 An Australian vegan woman took her neighbors to court to complain about the meat and fish smells from their cookouts. Cilla Carden said she “can’t enjoy” her backyard and “can’t go out there” due to their barbecues. While the litigation has been ongoing since August 2017, supreme court chief justice Peter Quinlan dismissed her appeal last month. A legal aid advocate suggests Carden take the matter to a dispute resolution mediator that would be “easier” and “cheaper” than handling the private affair in court. - THE GUARDIAN

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Correction: In the Sept. 3 morning edition of Inside Daily Brief, we misstated the location of a Catholic school that removed the Harry Potter series. The correct location is Nashville; this has been updated in our live issue. We regret the error.

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Written and curated by Darla Guillen Gilthorpe. Darla writes for the Houston Chronicle, where she was part of its 2018 Pulitzer Prize finalist staff. She was previously an editor at Vox Media site Eater and has had bylines in Elle Decor, SFGate and various other outlets. Follow her on Twitter here.

Editor: Bobby Cherry (senior editor at Inside, who’s always on social media).

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