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Inside Dev (Oct 16th, 2019)

1. Ionic React is now generally available. This is a React version of the Ionic Framework for building Progressive Web Apps, a well as iOS, Android, and desktop apps. To learn how to install Ionic React is v4.11, Ionic React's first version, check out the Ionic Framework post. Ionic also provides this tutorial to teach developers how to use it. - REACT STATUS

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2. Mozilla announced developers can now use the WebSocket inspector, which will be officially released in Firefox 71. The new feature is available for use in Firefox Developer Edition 70. Although Mozilla is releasing it now, the team says it will continue to update it, adding a Binary payload viewer and more in future releases. Click here for more details about planned new features.

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3. Strapi announced it raised $4 million in a seed funding led by Accel and Stride.vc. Strapi will use the money for its free open-source, JavaScript-based, customizable Headless CMS for developers. The founders of Docker and Cloudup,  Socket.io, Next.js and Zeit.co, and the ex-CTO of Cloudera also participated in the round. - TECHCRUNCH

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4. Npm is moving back to its developer roots, its founder and Chief Open Technologies officer Isaac Schlueter said. In an interview with Tech Republic, Schlueter says npm is moving away from a direct-to-enterprise approach back to one that is bottom-up, and developer-led. "A bottom-up strategy gives you the chance to really focus on the day-to-day welfare of the developers who work for and with you," Schlueter explains  "A top-down strategy introduces friction: You're constantly selling something you don't yet have." - TECH REPUBLIC

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5. Mozilla is trying to pressure Google into making its YouTube algorithms more accessible to independent researchers. The tech giant has launched a campaign called #YouTubeRegrets in which users have been sharing YouTube "horror stories" where they searched for one thing but landed somewhere else. Mozilla says Google should let researchers figure out how the site makes it recommendations to help change this, as well as to hold Google accountable. "That's the old era of 'Trust us, we've got this,'" Ashley Boyd, Mozilla's vice president of advocacy, said in response to YouTube claiming in June it implemented 30 changes this year that led to a 50% drop in time spent watching harmful misinformation, said. "Show us your work." -INSIDE GOOGLE via CNET

This story first appeared in Inside Google. If you want to keep up-to-date with more Google news, you can subscribe here.

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Written and curated by Inside Dev and Inside Deals Editor Sheena Vasani, a freelance journalist based in California. Proficient in Javascript and Ruby. Got my start at Dev Bootcamp and Thinkful. I tweet at @SheenaVasani and specifically about web development at @InsideDev2.

Edited by Bobby Cherry, a senior editor at Inside.com who also curates Inside Pittsburgh.

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