Inside
Inside Facebook

Inside Facebook (May 16th, 2017)

$FB (3:30 p.m. EST): $149.64 (↓ .37%) // 90-day high: $153.6 // 90-day low: $129.5 // More info

Facebook is trying to stop the publication of Facebook Live videos that aren't live. The company is warning creators with this message: “Don’t use the API to publish only images (ex: don’t publish static, animated, or looping images), or to live-stream polls associated with unmoving or ambient broadcasts.” Publishers who don't follow the rules will have reduced visibility on Facebook, and those who repeatedly break the rules may have their access to Facebook Live restricted. Facebook in January announced a list of the top 10 Live videos of 2016; half of them weren’t Live, but instead polls or countdowns on a static background. – TECHCRUNCH

Email x1 facebooklive
  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

The government of Thailand did not block Facebook despite threats by the country to do so. The military said recently that it would ban the company in Thailand if it did not disable Thailand-based users from being able to access content that criticizes the royal family. The government set a deadline of 10 am on May 16, but so far the pages remain. Facebook was under pressure from Thailand’s government last week to remove dozens of pages from its servers, after a video appeared to show the country’s new king walking through a shopping mall in a crop top. – TECHCRUNCH

Email x1 thailand2 master768
  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

Facebook is giving refunds to some advertisers after the company overstated the amount of clicks on marketers’ websites. Facebook said the discrepancy was minor and only occurred when users visited the site on mobile browsers—not in the Facebook app or on desktops, nd clicked on its “video carousel” ad formats to expand them in size. Those clicks were mistakenly registered as website clicks. Carolyn Everson, Facebook’s vice president of global marketing solutions, said the bug was uncovered as part of a recently introduced review process and the company is “committed to transparency” with its partners. Facebook has faced scrutiny in the past for misstating advertiser traffic. – WSJ

Email x1 facebook
  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

Failing to prevent its users' data from being accessed by advertisers has cost Facebook 150,000 euros or $166,000. France's data protection watchdog Commission nationale de l’informatique et des libertés, CNIL, found that Facebook was in violation of the French Data Protection Act. Among the investigation's findings: "It has been observed that Facebook proceeded to a massive compilation of personal data of Internet users in order to display targeted advertising. It has also been noticed that Facebook collected data on browsing activity of internet users on third-party websites, via the “datr” cookie, without their knowledge." The French watchdog had given Facebook a deadline to stop tracking non-users' web activity without their consent. Facebook disagreed with the order. – THE NEXT WEB

Email x1 zuckerberg f8 2017 796x398
  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

Meanwhile at Building 8 . . .

Email x1 facebookhandshake

A man covered himself in kerosene and then attempted to broadcast his suicide on Facebook Live. Jared McLemore, 33, took his shirt off and then doused himself, before igniting a lighter and bursting into flames. A man off-camera attempted to help him, but was unsuccessful. McLemore is a well-known musician in the Memphis area. McLemore’s ex-girlfriend, Alyssa Moore, was just a couple of feet away at the time of the incident. “Jared approached Alyssa and mumbled something about 'goodbye,' then grabbed her arm and wiped it on his chest to show he was covered in kerosene,” according to a GoFundMe page set up for Moore’s recovery effort. Court records showed that McLemore had a history of domestic abuse and was accused of strangling Moore. – NYDN

Email x1 memphis15n 2 web
  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

An activist and nonprofit employee is missing after posting a 28-minute video Monday on Facebook. Elizabeth “Liz” Ana Smith, president of the Eureka branch of the NAACP in Northern California, disappeared, according to the Humboldt County Sheriff’s Office. The 39-year-old was reported missing after she posted the video, where she said, “I am in heaven because I have been crucified.” Smith was CEO of the Boys and Girls Club of the Redwoods until March, when she was placed on indefinite administration leave. Smith had sent a scathing letter to the organization, alleging discrimination and mismanagement. – HUFFINGTON POST

Email x1 missingwoman
  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

How likely are you to recommend Inside Facebook to a friend or colleague?

          

Subscribe to Inside Facebook

MORE NEWSLETTERS

Small x2 screen shot 2016 08 18 at 10.43.17 am

Inside Daily Brief

A concise presentation of the world's most important, interesting news

DAILY
Small x2 newspaper

Inside Daily Brief

DAILY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via

Small x2 screen shot 2016 08 26 at 11.01.00 am

Inside Podcasting

Everything you need to know about the resurgence of the spoken word

TWICE WEEKLY
Small x2 sbs

Inside Podcasting

TWICE WEEKLY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via

Small x2 screen shot 2016 08 22 at 4.06.36 pm

Inside Security

David Strom's in-depth cybersecurity news and analysis

TWICE WEEKLY
Small x2 giphy 3

Inside Security

TWICE WEEKLY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via

Small x2 screen shot 2016 08 15 at 8.50.07 am

Inside VR & AR

The present and future of virtual/augmented reality news and technology

DAILY
Small x2 giphy 2

Inside VR & AR

DAILY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via