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Inside Founders (Jan 29th, 2019)

1. Men, youth and minorities will fare worse under job automation. Recent Brookings research into the prospects for robots replacing humans in employment indicate these groups face the most disruption. The report also analyzes such disruption by industry: Production, food service and transportation rank the highest for potential job replacement by automation. Geographically, workers in rural areas are likely to be more impacted. Demographically, minorities are at higher risk. Brookings also makes several policy recommendations, including a universal adjustment benefit for workers who lose their jobs to automation. — RECODE

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2. Trade secrecy may hamper companies' innovation in the future. Researchers Andrea Contigiani and David H. Hsu examined this issue and noted that companies are less reliant on patents for protecting their intellectual property. Rather, businesses increasingly rely on employee non-disclosure agreements and contracts. The conclusions are mixed, but do present some evidence that reliance on such agreements can hamper innovation as well as employee productivity. — HARVARD BUSINESS REVIEW

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3. Atlanta is the new Silicon Valley for black entrepreneurs. Paul Judge, an Atlanta-based serial entrepreneur who founded his cybersecurity company Pindrop there in 2011, attributes much of the city's burgeoning reputation as a start-up haven to its strong field of colleges, corporations and culture. The city has multiple universities graduating black engineers and developers—Judge received his Ph.d in network security from George Tech—as well as several large corporations such as Coca Cola and Home Depot. Moreover, Atlanta has a robust culture scene. — INC

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4. Female founders only raised 2.2 percent of the venture capital last year. That translates to $2.88 billion in 2018, according to PitchBook and All Raise. That money was divided across approximately 480 teams, and is the same percentage reported from the previous year. Nonetheless, female founders did have some gains last year, such as increased funding to companies run by single or all-female teams. Still, all-male teams received 76 percent of the $130 billion invested. — FORTUNE

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5. Startup NumberAI has raised $10.5 million for its service adding texting capability to business landlines. — VENTUREBEAT

6. Digital technology, such as tablet screens for ordering at the table, is transforming the restaurant industry, especially the rising use of pre-ordering apps. — FORBES

7. Startup Oxygen aims to offer credit and banking options to the growing freelance sector. — TECHCRUNCH

8. An angry boss helped shape "lean startup" creator Steve Blank's approach to marketing. — INC.

9. To succeed, startups should do things that don't scale, according to Abdo Riani, founder of StartupCircle.co. — ENTREPRENEUR

10. Technology startups have offered a variety of apps to the housing industry, but none address the challenge of affordability. — NEW YORK TIMES

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Julia Goldberg is a journalist and author living in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She writes regularly about the intersection of technology and culture, and is the executive director of MIX Santa Fe, a networking organization for entrepreneurs. She writes the Inside Founders newsletter and can be found on Twitter @votergirl.

Editing team: Lon Harris (editor-in-chief at Inside.com, game-master at Screen Junkies), Krystle Vermes (Breaking news editor at Inside, B2B marketing news reporter, host of the "All Day Paranormal" podcast), and Susmita Baral (editor at Inside, recent bylines in NatGeo, Teen Vogue, and Quartz. Runs the biggest mac and cheese account on Instagram).

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