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Inside Founders (May 17th, 2019)

1. The Long-Term Stock Exchange may change how startups operate when going public. The LTSE will be the 14th national stock exchange in the US, and was created by Silicon Valley entrepreneur Eric Ries, author of The Lean Startup. Ries raised $19 million from venture capitalists to launch the project, which received SEC regulatory approval on May 10. The Silicon Valley-based exchange is geared toward tech companies and designed to emphasize long-term innovation rather than short-term profitability. Some of the LTSE benefits for startups include tenured share voting—allowing for founder control without dual-class shares—and greater stock-ownership transparency for companies. — AXIOS

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2. Business leaders should focus on higher education, diversity and infrastructure rather than tax breaks to build strong startup ecosystems. So argue three experts on business and innovation by examining how cities can attract more startups. While Amazon's decision to invest in New York and Washington, D.C. was motivated by tax-breaks and incentives, focusing on more progressive civic engagement will foster innovation and economic growth. Investment in higher education will lead to greater entrepreneurship, as well as more public/private partnerships. Investment in diversity and inclusion programs like Boston-based Hack.Diversity has proven economic gains. Past investments in infrastructure such as transportation, housing and public education helped drive Silicon Valley's success. — HARVARD BUSINESS JOURNAL

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3. Follow Friday: What do radio-controlled cars, cakes and startup failure have in common? Entrepreneur Abigail Edgecliffe-Johnson. Find her on Twitter@DrEdgecliffe for thoughts on being a founder and a woman in tech. On Medium, the entrepreneur describes herself as a confectionary roboticist, and writes about tech and startup life. Her site Second1First speaks to her confectionary side, and includes not just elaborately designed cakes, cupcakes and cakepops, but also RoboCakes—baked goods with robotic elements. Edgecliffe-Johnson's own startup, Race Ya, was designed to teach children about engineering and science through toy cars, and received notice from Good Morning America, The Wall Street Journal and Today, to name a few. But her latest endeavor, TheShutDown (@ShutDownSurvey), addresses the non-unicorn in the room: startup failure. After Race Ya failed to meet its crowdfunding goals last year, Edgecliffe-Johnson began searching for resources if she needed to shutter. She didn't find them. So she's running a survey to gather intel and resources for an open-source project designed for other founders in similar situations. TheShutDown was recently featured by NPR.

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4. Seven startups focused on people living with disabilities will receive grants through Microsoft's AI for Accessibility program. The companies will gain access to Microsoft's cloud-computing platform Azure, Microsoft's AI resources, and financial coverage for data collection. The companies include Our Ability, whose founder John Robinson was born without limbs, had trouble securing employment, and whose startup connects disabled people with potential employers. Founder Dexter Ang created Pison, which uses an electromyography armband to detect movements by people with afflictions such as Parkinson's (which his mother had) and converts them into mouse movements. — TECHCRUNCH

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5. Amazon lead a $575 million funding round announced Friday for British food-delivery startup Deliveroo, co-founded in 2013 by William Shu, a former investment banking analyst who began his company by delivering food himself. — WALL STREET JOURNAL

6. Despite Pinterest's $41.4 million loss in the first three months of 2019, co-founder and CEO Ben Silbermann says the company's focus hasn't changed since its IPO debut last month, and remains geared to helping people "...discover inspiring ideas for every aspect of their lives." — CNN

7. Drexel University Professor Youngmoo Kim, also the founder of Philadelphia's ExCITe Center, says the next generation of founders needs to shift away from "tech monoculture" to promote diversity and equity.TECHNICALLY PHILADELPHIA

8. Seventy-four startups will compete for $500,000 in the Austin-based accelerator MassChallenge; most of the early-stage startups are from Texas, and 56 percent were founded by women. — XCONOMY

9. Rapper and record-label founder Berner (Gilbert Milam Jr.) built his cannabis and fashion line Cookies around a particular cannabis strain after realizing early on that the cannabis industry itself lacked branding. — ENTREPRENEUR

10. Under-30 scientists are using gene editing technology CRISPR to found companies focused on disease detection and medical therapies—and are receiving millions in funding to do so. — FORBES

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Julia Goldberg is a journalist and author living in Santa Fe, New Mexico. She writes regularly about the intersection of technology and culture, and is the executive director of MIX Santa Fe, a networking organization for entrepreneurs. She writes the Inside Founders newsletter and can be found on Twitter @votergirl.

Editing team: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside); Susmita Baral (senior editor at Inside, who runs the biggest mac and cheese account on Instagram); and David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology).

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