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 Inside Human Resources

Inside Human Resources (Apr 10th, 2019)

Hi! I’m Nick, a writer at Inside.com. On behalf of our publication, I want to thank you for being a subscriber. I recently launched the Inside HR newsletter to bring you the top stories about human resources. I see that you recently took a look at one the Inside HR newsletters, which is why I’d like to personally invite you to join the newsletter. Please feel free to send me any interesting news you would like to see covered in this newsletter. You can reach me directly at Nick.Shekeryk@Inside.com. I look forward to adding exciting local news to your inbox each week!— Nick Shekeryk

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1. At CNBC’s @Work Talent + HR Summit last week, IBM CEO Ginni Rometty claimed that the IT company’s artificial intelligence has the ability to predict when employees will leave their jobs with 95 percent accuracy. According to Rometty, traditional HR models with humans are becoming obsolete as AI has proven to be more capable at identifying key metrics such as the need for job training and when employees should get raises and promotions. The New York-based tech giant has already replaced 30 percent of its HR staff with AI technology and plans to increase that number in the coming years. – CNBC

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2. The firing of one county official and the resignation of another has led to a shakeup within the administration of North Carolina’s Northampton County. County Board of Commissioners Clerk Komita Hendricks was voted out of her position for “unacceptable personal conduct,” and fired from her role as Administrative Assistant for divulging confidential information to third parties. HR Director Marcenda Rogers resigned, citing “confusion, dishonesty, deceitfulness, and disrespect” from within her department. County officials said they plan to respond to Rogers’ claims once they learn more about the situation. – ROANOKE-CHOWAN NEWS HERALD

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3. Amazon posted job openings for Project Kuiper, its effort to send satellites into low Earth orbit to provide broadband internet access around the globe. The company announced plans for the code-named project and posted 73 Kuiper-related jobs on its website, with all but one job located in Bellevue, Washington. According to Geekwire, the majority of the opening are for engineers specializing in systems modeling, antennas, semiconductor and hardware design, satellite and spacecraft design, flight software, and communication systems. - GEEKWIRE

Note: This article originally appeared in a recent issue of Inside Amazon.

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4. Stanford University has expelled a student linked to an admissions cheating scandal. The student, who has not been identified, presented false sailing credentials to enter the university, even though she was accepted through the standard process and not as an athlete. The student is linked to a $500,000 contribution to Stanford’s sailing program that came from the Key Worldwide Foundation – the charity at the heart of the scandal. – STANFORD DAILY

Note: This article originally appeared in a recent issue of Inside Daily Brief.

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Workforce Wednesday– The follies of Microsoft’s HR department
By Nick Shekeryk

Last month, a simple email from one female Microsoft employee to another asking for career advancement advice quickly sparked into a 90-page-plus email chain that exposed rampant discrimination and sexual harassment towards women within the tech company. As many female employees recounted their experiences of being personally affected or bearing witness to it happening, one of the most alarming discoveries was the lack of support from the company’s HR department.

As an HR professional, one of your key roles is to enforce the laws, policies, and regulations made to protect your employees from on-the-job issues that threaten their safety and security. When employees face problems— especially those involving discrimination and harassment— your company’s HR department should be prepared to objectively assess and reconcile the situations accordingly

When your HR department neglects objectivity, it compromises the integrity of not only the entire department but the whole company. Your company becomes one that will have difficulty both keeping and hiring employees due to a lack of trust in their best interest. 

Kathleen Hogan, the head of Microsoft’s HR department, as well as members of the executive team— including CEO Satya Nadella— have begun investigations into the company’s claims of discrimination and harassment of female employees, but the damage may have already been done.

While the giant tech company probably has enough money to buy themselves out of their massive blunder, let it be a lesson to hold your HR team accountable for properly responding to the actions of unruly employees. It’ll keep your company respectable and your current and future employees safe from workplace injustices.

Every Wednesday we'll feature an aspect of the workforce that is relevant to the world of human resources. We will include links to resources for learning more. If you have ideas for an interesting HR-related story we can feature, or anything else you'd like to see us cover, hit reply to this email!
 

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5. Taco Bell announced plans to throw about 600 hiring parties across the U.S. later this month. Complete with free food and swag, the fast-food chain hopes to draw the interest of prospective employees and plans to create 100,000 new jobs by 2022. – CNN

6. Creating an inviting workspace can be as simple as giving your office a color upgrade. HR Dive makes a case for color theory’s influence in building the office environment that employees will enjoy. HR DIVE

7. Bank of American plans to raise its minimum wage to $20 per hour and offer affordable healthcare to minimum wage employees. The Charlotte-headquartered bank, which currently offers a minimum wage of $15 per hour, announced it will jump to $17 per hour in May and steadily increase until it reaches $20 in 2021. – NPR

8. Public Defender Molly Owens was hired as the new HR Director of the Aspen School District in Colorado this week. Owens replaces Elizabeth Hodges, who resigned in January amid the district learning of her unethical legal misconduct for which she was disbarred. – ASPEN TIMES

9. According to a study by Kronos and the Human Capital Institute, salaried and hourly jobs are becoming increasingly harder to fill and recruitment is costing companies more than it did even a couple of years ago. Having a high-performing organization with strong internal candidates is the best way to reduce the time on money it takes to fill positions. – HR DIVE

10. “No job is below the CEO!” exclaimed the writer of a LinkedIn post that showed JetBlue CEO Robin Hayes collecting trash from passengers aboard a flight last week. – USA TODAY

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Nick Shekeryk has a professional background rich in digital marketing and media. His work has appeared in The Seattle Times, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, New York Post, The Post-Standard, and on MSN.com, among others. He has a graduate degree in journalism from Syracuse University, as well as creative writing and philosophy degrees from Seattle University. He lives in Seattle, WA, and spends his spare time playing and coaching baseball, running half marathons, and seeing as much live music as possible. You can follow Nick on Twitter at @NickShekeryk.

Editing team: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside); Susmita Baral (senior editor at Inside, who runs the biggest mac and cheese account on Instagram); and David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology).

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