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Inside IoT

Inside IoT (Aug 14th, 2017)

Companies are struggling to understand how to integrate large amounts of data collected from multiple IoT devices. With 30 billion smart devices in existence, entrepreneurs are trying to maximize ways to use the data. In an interview with Entrepreneur, Rabih Nassar, founder and CEO of IoT solutions firm Scriptr, offered some tips. "If you're a smart-building tenant, you can have a single app that controls your thermostats, lighting, heating/AC, blinds, building gates and garage doors -- even though those services are actually being provided from a variety of incompatible physical and device-management and connectivity platforms.” Companies should work on integrating platforms, consolidating apps and develop partnerships, Nassar said. – ENTREPRENEUR

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A Swiss company that plans to launch satellites by 2021 to support Internet of Things applications has raised an initial $3 million funding round. ELSE has announced that it closed the round with several investors, led by Airbus Ventures. The plan is to eventually launch a constellation of 64 satellites, at a cost of about $50 million.  – SPACE NEWS

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The incredible advantages of smart phone technology. . . 

Smart locks manufacturer LockState issued an incorrect firmware update for its WiFi-enabled smart locks. The over-the-air update caused the devices to lose connectivity to the vendor's servers and the ability to open doors for its users. One LockState product was affected, the LockState RemoteLock 6i (also known as 6000i). The product is sold mainly by Airbnb hosts to configure custom access codes for each Airbnb renter without needing to give out a key. The botched updated bricked the device's smart code access mode, forcing Airbnb hosts to scramble to get customers physical keys. – BLEEPING COMPUTER

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The Internet of Things may eventually revolutionize the world of prisons. A professor at an Australian university is working on the Technological Incarceration Project, an advanced form of home detention, using artificial intelligence, machine-learning algorithms and lightweight electronic sensors to monitor convicted criminals. The technology might one day replace security guards. "If we had to use human beings, the cost of monitoring every single type of interaction would be prohibitively expensive," Dan Hunter said. Offenders would be fitted with an electronic bracelet that would deliver an electric shock if an algorithm detects that the inmate is about to take part in jail criminal activity. Some opponents, however, worry that the technology might not be less expensive than guards, and could lead to security issues if a remote hacker got into the system. – ABC

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There's been some backlash to a statement by the Children's Commissioner for England, where she said parents must stop their children from overusing social media “like junk food.” Anne Longfield said a week ago that parents should “step up” and be proactive to stop their children from bingeing on the internet during the summer. But former Government Communications Headquarters chief Robert Hannigan responded: “The assumption that time online or in front of a screen is life wasted needs challenging. It is driven by fear. The best thing we can do is to focus less on the time they spend on screens at home and more on the nature of the activity.” – THE GUARDIAN

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