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Inside Los Angeles

Inside Los Angeles (Aug 19th, 2019)

☀️ The high/low tomorrow will be 82/66 downtown, 75/64 near the coast, and 89/63 in the valley.

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1. The Los Angeles Times has revealed yet another parent who paid William "Rick" Singer to bribe her son's way into UCLA. According to the Times, Xiaoning Sui, who lives in British Columbia, agreed to pay Singer $400,000 to secure her son admission to the school. Singer then allegedly bribed former UCLA men's soccer coach Jorge Salcedo $100,000 to recruit her son on a soccer scholarship, despite the student not playing soccer competitively. Sui has not been charged in connection with the college bribery scandal that has to date resulted in 51 indictments and several guilty pleas. The Times did not identify Sui's son by name, as he may be a minor, though his admission was approved in November 2018. – LA TIMES

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2. Video obtained by The Daily Beast purports to show students from Pacifica High School in Garden Grove, California, giving a Nazi salute during an awards ceremony. According to The Daily Beast, the video was shot behind closed doors with Pacifica High water polo players, and originally posted to a student athlete's Instagram in 2018. The school became aware of the video in March of this year, but would not reveal what, if any, disciplinary action was taken against the students. Parents and students who spoke anonymously to the publication said the school never addressed the issue to the community as a whole, and could not say whether or not any of the involved players had been suspended. This is the second incident involving Nazi imagery and Orange County high school students this year. In March, photos spread on social media of high schoolers playing beer pong with cups arranged in the swastika symbol. – THE DAILY BEAST

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3. In a series of interviews, NPR details the struggle of those who live in their vehicles, and how they structure their lives around avoiding citations surrounding LA's controversial "Sleeping In Cars" law. 67-year-old Edith Grays moved into her motor home with her husband after they were unable to afford their rent. She says she spends all of her time "looking for parking or planning where to park next." Enforcement of the law mostly revolves around officers asking those living in their vehicles to move – citations are rarely issued. After all, what's the use in fining someone who can't afford to pay a fine? An estimated 10,000 LA residents are currently living in their vehicles. – NPR

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4. A new lawsuit filed in Los Angeles accuses Church of Scientology leader David Miscavige and actor Danny Masterson of covering up rape, abuse, and human trafficking. The LAPD began investigating sexual assault allegations made against Masterson by four women as early as 2016. Three of those women were also Church of Scientology members. The new lawsuit alleges that Masterson and Miscavige sought to intimidate the accusers and seeks to further implicate the Church of Scientology more broadly in conspiracies to kidnap and falsely imprison. Masterson has not been charged with a crime in Los Angeles. The civil case brought against him and Miscavige seeks an LA jury trial and damages. – VULTURE

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5. Model Alicia Arden says she reported an incident involving financier Jeffrey Epstein to Santa Monica police in 1997, but that nothing was done. Arden alleges that Epstein groped her during a Victoria's Secret catalog interview. She filed a complaint with police, but says she never heard from them again. The Santa Monica Police Department told the Associated Press that Epstein denied the accusation in an interview at the time, and that the accuser did not want to press charges. Arden denies this and disputes the police claims that she only wanted Epstein given a warning. She told the AP, "The fact that they didn’t do anything, and they discredited me, is just a stab to my heart."  – ASSOCIATED PRESS

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6. In a twist to a story that keeps getting stranger, the In-N-Out Burger in Universal City is now also wrapped up in the Jeffrey Epstein saga. Epstein's longtime associate Ghislaine Maxwell was photographed outside the popular burger spot eating lunch and reading Ted Gup's "The Book of Honor: The Secret Lives and Deaths of CIA Operatives." Maxwell appears to have posed for the photo, which quickly spread on social media and even invited copycat photos, including one from comedy writer Scott Gairdner. In a follow-up tweet, Gairdner says that as they took the photo, another woman approached and said "I'm here to do the same thing!" The Maxwell Burger Incident, as with all things Epstein, has inspired and delighted internet theorists. – NY POST

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7. The Los Angeles Department of Transportation is installing a series of rainbow discs on certain street lights in memory of those who've been killed in traffic collisions. The discs create a visible "rainbow halo" on the sidewalk. The first disc was installed last week in Sherman Oaks in memory of 16-year-old Conor Lynch, who was struck and killed by an SUV in 2010. The rainbow halos are a project of Southern California Families for Safe Streets, who hope to eliminate fatalities on LA city streets. – CURBED LA

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8. K. Connie Kang, a pioneering reporter who covered the LA Riots for the Times in 1992, has died at 76. Kang, who the Times believes was the first Korean woman reporter in the U.S., was instrumental in detailing the riots from the perspective of many Korean-Americans, as she was the only journalist who could speak their language. Kang left the Times in 2008 to become a Presbyterian minister. – LA TIMES

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9. LA Dodgers pitcher Julio Urias has been suspended for 20 games following allegations of domestic violence. Charges against Urias were dropped after he was accused of shoving a woman in May – the suspension comes as a result of Major League Baseball's own investigation. The Dodgers said in a statement that they are encouraged that Urias has "taken responsibility for his actions." He will be eligible to return to the team in September. – FOX NEWS
 

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10. A GoFundMe campaign in San Pedro aims to raise $150,000 to create a bronze statue of Charles Bukowski. The celebrated poet was born in Germany and lived much of his life in East Hollywood before moving to San Pedro in the late 1970s. The San Pedro Heritage Museum plans to have the statue completed by August 16, 2020, the late poet's 100th birthday. – KCRW

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Jonathan Harris is a Los Angeles-based writer. Previously, he wrote for The Huffington Post, TakePart.com, and the YouTube channel What’s Trending. He’s a frequent performer at the Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre in Hollywood. Follow him on Twitter @countrycaravan.

This newsletter is edited by Inside senior editor Bobby Cherry, a Pittsburgh-based journalist who's always on social media. Reach him at bobby@inside.com.

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