Inside Marketing - October 21st, 2019

Inside Marketing (Oct 21st, 2019)

Brand Safety / Presidential Marketing / Gamers Like Spon Con


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1. The marketing effort for President Trump's 2020 campaign is already ubiquitous, and it's only going to get bigger. The incumbent's marketing push has been spread across YouTube, Facebook, and sites that serve Google-managed ads, and includes campaigns like an "Impeachment Poll," an "Official Impeachment Defense Task Force," and videos that contain conspiracy theories about former Vice President Joe Biden. In addition to the targeted ads, the campaign is doing a brisk trade in apparel, collecting data it can use to re-target messages with every order. - NEW YORK TIMES


2. Doctors are reportedly suggesting 3D mammograms based on marketing, not medicine. A Kaiser Health News* investigation suggests that a multi-million-dollar marketing push by tomosynthesis manufacturers has engaged hospitals, doctors and even some patient advocates to promote its tech to women at risk for breast cancer. According to experts like John Hopkins University professor Dr. Otis Brawley, the efficacy of 3D mammograms is still unknown, and it's "unethical to push a product before you know it helps people." Diana Zuckerman, president of the National Center for Health Research, is even harsher, saying that there's "no meaningful evidence" that the 3D scan helps patients, and that the efforts to market it prey on the vulnerable, since “if there was ever an audience susceptible to direct-to-consumer advertising, it’s women afraid of breast cancer.” - USA TODAY

*Kaiser Health News is a non-profit news org that is editorially independent of the Kaiser Family Foundation, and is not associated with Kaiser Permanente.


3. Kimberly-Clark's CMO is leaving after only 18 months on the job. Giusy Buonfantino was named to the position in May of 2018, an internal promotion after joining the company in 2011. According to a memo sent to employees, Buonfantino will be leaving the company as of November 1. A spokesperson was extremely close-mouthed on the matter, telling Ad Week “we appreciate Giusy’s leadership over the past decade, however, we cannot comment on any additional personnel matters." As of this writing, Buonfantino had yet to make a statement regarding her career change or to announce any future plans. - AD WEEK


4. Good sales aren't enough to counterbalance Chick-fil-A's UK marketing mess. The chicken chain, which has grown steadily over 51 years to $10 billion in 2018, was seemingly driven from the UK over its founders' Christian-focused donations and anti-LGBTQ remarks. The company opened its first UK location in Reading on October 10 and sales are "exceeding expectations," it says. However, it's faced ongoing protests from groups like Reading Pride, and it will shutter when its six-month-long lease is up. - BBC


5. Most video game players don't mind sponsored marketing content during gameplay. According to a Hub Entertainment Research study of 2,636 U.S. consumers, 61 percent of all gamers who have played a game that contains sponsored content said that the spon made the game "more fun," and only 23 percent said that the marketing messages made the game less enjoyable to play. - MARKETING DIVE


6. A marketing campaign that features a bound President Trump is raising eyebrows in Times Square. Dhvani, a Portland-based apparel company, is behind the ad, which depicts a presidential look-alike seemingly imprisoned by a model. According to Dhvani CEO Avi Brown, the campaign "is an expression of our First Amendment right," and a commentary on the administration's proposed restrictions on abortion. - ASSOCIATED PRESS


7. Marketing for big brands is appearing next to allegedly pirated content. Campaigns from brands including TikTok, Madden Mobile, Pandora, Kia, and Walgreens have been spotted on the Tea.tv app and website, which hosts content that appears to be stolen from Netflix and HBO. The issue has spurred finger-pointing in the business, with brands blaming ad tech companies with low bars to entry, and ad tech companies blaming brands that aren't specific enough about where they want campaigns to appear. - CNBC


8. Hyundai just lost its CMO. Dean Evans, who led marketing efforts at the car company for the last four years, is leaving Hyundai to “pursue other career opportunities," he said. COO Brian Smith will handle Evans's responsibilities until a replacement is found. - MEDIAPOST


9. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is seeking a Communications and Consumer Associate Administrator. The position, which is based in Washington, DC, oversees the offices of Media Relations, Consumer Information, Communications Services, and Digital Strategies. Qualified candidates must have a "demonstrated ability to manage market research and collaborate with subject matter experts to develop and implement public awareness campaigns designed to influence and alter consumer behavior." - USA JOBS


10. The Ad Council is looking for an Assistant Manager, PR & Social Media. In the role at the New York, New York, non-profit, you'll be dedicated to between six and eight national campaigns focused on using "communications to drive social change." Qualified candidates must have excellent writing skills and "the ability to build strong relationships both internally and with external partners." - JOBVITE


Eve Batey is a writer, editor, and consultant based in San Francisco. She also owns a store and writes about the business of true crime. You can find her on Instagram at @evelb or via email at eve@inside.com.

Editor: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside).


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