Inside | Real news, curated by real humans
Inside Media

Inside Media (Feb 11th, 2019)

1. The pro-Trump brother of Jeff Bezos's paramour allegedly leaked his texts to AMI. Fears of Murdoch-level phone hacking or Saudi string-pulling can apparently be put to rest, as sources inside the National Enquirer's parent company say that texts and photos (some published, some used in an alleged attempt to extort the Amazon founder/Washington Post owner) were supplied to the tabloid by Michael Sanchez, reportedly a friend of Roger Stone, Carter Page, and Scottie Nell Hughes. He's also the brother of Lauren Sanchez, with whom Bezos has reportedly been involved for the last ten or so months. Speaking with Fox News, Michael denies a role in the matter, saying "my friendships are being used as a weapon against me, but the dots don't connect." - DAILY BEAST

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

2. Bob Costas says he left NBC over coverage of concussion issues in the NFL. Costas, who left NBC last month after a 40 year career with the network, still had three years on his contract when he hit the door. The reason, he said in an interview that aired Sunday, was that NBC quashed coverage of brain damage in pro football as the network was in negotiations with the NFL. Costas says that in 2015, he came to NBC Sports chairman Mark Lazarus and executive producer Sam Flood with commentary he planned on during NBC’s “Sunday Night Football” coverage, but was told "this is a very well-written piece, wouldn’t change a comma. We can’t air it." Costas said that “it was at that point that I realized that this was an untenable situation for me." He was pulled from Super Bowl coverage in 2018 after bringing up concussions again, and was told he'd "crossed a line." - ESPN

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

3. Patch (remember Patch?) is turning a profit. A network of local news sites launched by AOL in 2007, since 2014 it's been operated by Hale Global, a so-called "turnaround company." And around it has certainly turned, as Patch's 1200 sites generated $20 million in annual ad revenue last year - a profit, owner Charles Hale says. 110 journalists, many of whom cover multiple cities, now work for the company (salaries range from $45-60K). The platform also encourages user-generated content, is seeking syndication deals, and "is starting to use software to write some commodity stories." - RECODE

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

4. Writer Antonio García Martínez says that the current upheaval in journalism is returning the industry to its roots. Writing for Wired, the author and former tech worker says that Benjamin Franklin wouldn't have worked at a newspaper, he'd "have an anonymous Twitter account with a huge following that he’d use to routinely troll political opponents." Martínez says that it's journalistic objectivity that's dying, as personality-driven publications take the media back to its 19th century roots. "Those who claim democracy requires the precise flavor of journalism we’ve known for a century or so will have to explain how our republic survived the century preceding," he claims. Do you agree? - WIRED

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

5. A veteran radio host was killed in Mexico this weekend, the second journalist slain in the country this year. Two people reportedly shot Jesús Eugenio Ramos Rodríguez eight times as he sipped coffee at an Emiliano Zapata restaurant. - KNIGHT CENTER

6. CJR just went down a serious "defenestration" hole. First used around 1619 to mean "the action of throwing a person out of a window," it's now used colloquially to refer to firings and impeachments. - CJR

7. The Philip Meyer Award winners for 2018 include an investigation into the hundreds of unaccounted-for deaths as a result of Hurricane Maria and a report on environmental hazards in Philadelphia’s public schools. “Hurricane Maria’s Dead,” a collaboration between Centro de Periodismo Investigativo, Quartz and the Associated Press took home to grand prize of $500. - IRE

8. The Native American Journalists Association has launched an initiative called the Indigenous Investigative Collective. Intended to support indigenous reporters via training and resources, it will also help manage sensitive docs and news tips. - NAJA

9. GateHouse Media, which across 37 states reportedly owns 325 community publications, 555 local websites, and 145 daily newspapers, has laid off around 60 reporters and photographers. The company's recently made two multi-million dollar acquisitions, of the Oklahoman in September, and the Akron Business Journal last April. - BUSINESS INSIDER

10. Jill Abramson is now admitting that she failed to properly credit sources in her book "Merchants of Truth." She denies allegations of plagiarism, however, saying there was "no attempt to pass off someone's ideas, opinions and phrasings as my own." - CNN

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

Eve Batey, who pens Inside San Francisco and Inside Media for you five days a week, is a writer, editor, and consultant based in San Francisco. You can find her on Instagram at @evelb, or email her at eve@inside.com.

Editing team: Lon Harris (editor-in-chief at Inside.com, game-master at Screen Junkies) and Susmita Baral (editor at Inside, recent bylines in NatGeo, Teen Vogue, and Quartz. Runs the biggest mac and cheese account on Instagram).

Subscribe to Inside Media