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Inside NYC

Inside NYC (Aug 22nd, 2019)

1. The final punishment has been dished out in the case of Eric Garner's death: the forfeiting of 20 days of vacation time. The punishment was handed out to NYPD sergeant Kizzy Adonis, who arrived on the scene where several officers had Garner pinned down to the ground — she was originally charged with “failure to supervise,” and was the only officer besides the now-fired Daniel Pantaleo to be charged with breaking any rules in the incident. By forfeiting 20 days of vacation time, sergeant Adonis will keep her job. —NEW YORK TIMES

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2. The 18-year-old motorist accused of causing a fatal cyclist crash almost two weeks ago has been charged with manslaughter and several other charges, including criminally negligent homicide, reckless endangerment, reckless driving, and vehicular assault. The crash in question occurred in Midwood, where the suspect Umar Mizra Baig was reportedly traveling twice the speed limit when he ran a red light and struck another vehicle, sending it into a nearby cyclist. The city has recently come under fire for issuing slaps on the wrist, if any punishment, for drivers who cause cycling accidents. —NEW YORK DAILY NEWS 

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THROWBACK THURSDAY

The Old Stone House

3. Park Slope, now known for its brownstone homes and well-off families, was once the location of the biggest battles in the Revolutionary War. On August 27, 1776, the British Army and German Hessian mercenaries outsmarted the revolutionaries, who were overwhelmed from attacks in multiple directions during the Battle of Brooklyn. As George Washington and his troops retreated to Manhattan, the 1st Maryland Regiment made their last stand in front of the "Old Stone House," a colonial farmhouse that was located in present-day Park Slope. Hundreds of Marylanders died, but Washington was able to successfully retreat with his army. 

That "Old Stone House" stood in its original form until its eventual destruction around 1897, but it was later reconstructed in the 1930s with some original materials. Now, the Stone House serves as a small museum, where visitors can learn about the location's history, including the Battle of Brooklyn. The house, located at 336 Third Street, Brooklyn, NY 11215, is open for visits on the weekend, or by appointment. —CULTURE TRIP 

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4. The Department of Consumer Affairs proposed a new set of rules that could hamper the ability of Statue of Liberty ticket scammers to target victims in Battery Park. Under the new rules, ticket sellers would be required to tell customers if their boat tours don't have a stop at Ellis Island, and they would be prohibited from selling tickets to destinations their tours don't actually go to. Additionally, ticket sellers would be prohibited from selling tickets for rides that are traditionally free, like the Staten Island Ferry. —ABC 7

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5. The Museum of Ice Cream, a temporary museum experience that led the "pop-up" charge in 2016, plans to open a permanent location in SoHo. The new building, at 558 Broadway, will feature 25,000 square feet of space that includes the popular sprinkle pool, a three-story slide, and 13 new installations that didn't appear in previous pop-ups. The Museum of Ice Cream, and plenty of other short-term pop-up experiences, recently found a huge following in metropolitan areas like New York — and there are a plethora of Instagram-friendly photo ops. —ARTNET

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6. The Post reports that some NYC eateries are struggling to comply with the city's recent ban on CBD-infused food — in July, the Health Department visited 15 eateries across the city and forced them to destroy their CBD food and drink. Restaurant owners and workers who spoke to The Post said despite repeated warnings from the Health Department, many eateries figured they could get away with continuing to sell the CBD-infused products, or at least until their inventory ran out. Being forced to destroy the products is likely only a minor headache compared to the $200 to $650 fines that can be imposed starting this October. —NEW YORK POST 

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7. After the beloved Brooklyn pizzeria, Di Fara, was shut down for unpaid taxes, Mayor de Blasio tweeted that he's "ready to do anything I can to get them reopened." Following the Mayor's tweet, City Hall released a statement “reaching out to the family to determine the extent of their problems and whether there is anything we can do to help,” but didn't elaborate on specifically how the city plans to help. Governor Cuomo felt a little less forgiving about the unpaid state taxes: “Now, if he wants to pay the $200,000 on behalf of the pizza place, he can do that. That’s fine," Cuomo said. "And if he wants to get $200,000 worth of pizza, that’s his business. But he can’t forgive state taxes.” —GRUB STREET 

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8. Rapper Cardi B called out the NYPD after she says the department forced the cancellation of a back-to-school supply giveaway hosted by her friend, Star Brim. In a now-deleted video, Cardi B lashed out against the department for allegedly intimidating the principal of a Brooklyn school into cancelling the event, telling the NYPD to "motherf***ing suck a fart and suffocate on it.” The NYPD said the whole ordeal was a "misunderstanding." —PEOPLE 

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9. Life in New York City is really just the time in between moving — it's going to happen eventually, so you might as well be prepared. Thankfully, the staff at Curbed has you covered with a comprehensive guide on everything you need to know to move out of your cramped apartment into a (hopefully) slightly less cramped apartment, including how to choose a neighborhood, which websites to use to find apartment listings, and some design inspiration for once you're settling in to your new home. —CURBED 

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10. A lot of NYC-related news isn't the most uplifting or inspiring — so here's a palette cleanser: Gothamist profiled the subway's "Happiest Conductor," Kenneth Burton, who always makes an effort to make passengers smile during one of the most stressful parts of their day. Burton has only been conducting for five years — he was an NYCHA employee before being laid off — but he routinely veers off the MTA conductor script to make passengers laugh, warn them about inclement weather, or to simply provide another voice that's not the automated announcements. —GOTHAMIST 

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Written and curated by Sean Wolfe. He is a tech reporter based in Brooklyn, New York, and has previously worked at Business Insider and GIE Media. Follow him on Twitter at @seanthomaswolfe.

Editor: David Stegon, senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology.

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