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Inside SaaS (May 23rd, 2019)

1. Huawei says its proprietary operating systems could be ready to launch this year if it is permanently barred from using Google's Android and Microsoft's Windows operating systems. Google recently rescinded Huawei's Android license following an executive order placing the Chinese company on a US blacklist (although that order was softened with a 90-day reprieve), and Microsoft appears to have removed Huawei's laptops from its online store. Richard Yu, the CEO of Huawei's consumer business said the company is prepared to ship its own operating systems by the end of the year if it has to, but for now, the company is "still committed to Microsoft Windows and Google Android." —CNBC 

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2. Google announced that it stored a "small percentage" of G-Suite user passwords in unprotected plaintext, which affected some corporate and business accounts. Google said individual consumer accounts weren't affected, and a bug in the G-Suite admin password recovery feature caused plaintext passwords to be stored in the control panel. Although Google said it patched the bug, the passwords would have been accessible to company admins, Google employees, or potential hackers. —WIRED

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THROWBACK THURSDAY

3. At its 2007 launch, the iPhone took the world by storm. Hopeful customers lined up around the block to get their hands on what they saw as the future of phone technology — and it wasn't without good reason. iOS 1 was quite exciting for those who were used to flip phones or Blackberries — the touch screen controls were intuitive, the apps were reminiscent of those from macOS, and the phone was relatively easy to use. 

Now, iOS 12 is almost completely unrecognizable when compared to early iOS versions. The UI is much cleaner, there's a whole suite of new native apps, and there are plenty more touch-based controls. Although Apple has been criticized for being slow on the draw when it comes to releasing OS features compared to Android, it's still fascinating to look at how far the OS has come. Computer World offers a slideshow-based look through each iteration of iOS, from the 2007 launch to the current day. —COMPUTER WORLD

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4. Shopify announced that it's partnering with the Canadian DMZ tech incubator in an effort to "improve access for Black entrepreneurs by providing a new path to success." Through the Black Innovation Fellowship program, Shopify and DMZ will provide black entrepreneurs with "growth mentors," exclusive workshops, and a workspace in downtown Toronto. The program has an initial fundraising goal of $1M, and participants will also be in contact with a network of 350 investors. DMZ executive director Abdullah Snobar said black entrepreneurs in the program will not be asked to hand over equity, and he wants the program to be "completely nondilutive." —CRUNCHBASE 

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5. After teasing the Edge browser for macOS earlier this month, Microsoft is letting Mac users download a preview version of the browser. —THE VERGE

6. Zendesk has acquired Smooch, the business-to-customer messaging platform, and launched new integrations for WhatsApp and Slack. —VENTURE BEAT 

7. Adobe updated its Adobe Scan document scanner app with support for more document types like forms, business cards, and whiteboards. —ANDROID POLICE 

8. GitHub is introducing the ability for users to financially support developers through a Patreon-like feature called GitHub Sponsors. —THE VERGE 

9. Data storage startup Snowflake is reportedly planning to add support for Google Cloud, meaning its customers will have access to the big three cloud providers: Amazon, Microsoft, and Google. —BUSINESS INSIDER 

10. Microsoft is rolling out the May 2019 Windows update, and several features won't appear in the latest OS version: SMS message syncing and the XDDM-based remote display driver. —PCMAG 

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Written and curated by Sean Wolfe. He is a tech reporter based in Brooklyn, New York, and has previously worked at Business Insider and GIE Media. Follow him on Twitter at @seanthomaswolfe.

Editing team: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside) and David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology).

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