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Inside San Francisco (Sep 26th, 2016)

All Mission Station officers are now wearing body cameras. Around 160 cameras were given to the Mission Station, according to the San Francisco Police Department. A total of 122 patrol officers, 23 sergeants, and five lieutenants will be mandated to wear the cameras. “My hope is people will consider their actions knowing that [they are] being recorded,” said station captain Daniel Perea. “Visual and audio will be captured and provide an objective documentation of what occurred.” – ML

Favorable weather helped firefighters who have been attempting to contain a 1,500-acre wildfire in rural Sonoma County. The fire is located near The Geysers, a geothermal facility. Warm temperatures today may make it more difficult to contain the blaze. The cause of the fire is still under investigation, and one of The Geysers’ plants has been evacuated. As of Monday morning, the fire is 20 percent contained. – SFG

Independent soil engineers have begun installing data devices to monitor the soil around the sinking Millennium Tower. The 58-story building has sunk 16 inches and tilted two inches since 2009. The homeowners association is paying for the testing. Millennium Partners, which developed the building, claims its foundation is safe. – NBCBA

San Francisco voters could increase the prominence of a police oversight group with the passing of a November ballot measure. Proposition G, as it’s called, would expand the powers of the Office of Citizens Complaints, which investigates police misconduct. If it passes, it would also rename the OCC as the Department of Police Accountability. “This is a continuation of the work we have been doing, pulling the OCC out of the Police Department’s budget so it can stand independent and strong on its own,” said Supervisor Malia Cohen. – SFE

A new program has been launched in San Francisco to help turn dog waste into compost with the use of compostable doggy bags. BioBags is partnering with the city’s open space board to provide compostable bags, bins, and pick-up services throughout San Francisco. The program officially began at the Starr King Open Space this weekend. There are about 120,000 dogs in San Francisco, and a majority of their waste ends up in a landfills. “We’re happy the folks at the Starr King Open Space took us up on our offer to demonstrate this is an effective way to reduce landfill for Zero Waste objectives,” said Mark Williams, vice president of market development at BioBag. – SFC

Some of the LED lights being used in streetlights in cities, including San Francisco, are facing scrutiny from the American Medical Association. The AMA issued a warning in June that claimed high-intensity LED streetlights may disturb sleep rhythms and increase the risk of serious health conditions. However, many communities are hesitant to phase out the LEDs, as they are 50 percent more energy-efficient sodium lights. – SFG

WHAT TO DO THIS WEEK
Get Your Tickets for Laughs: The Best of San Francisco Stand-Up Comedy Show will be held on Friday, Sept. 30 from 8:00 p.m. to 9:15 p.m. at the Variety Preview Theater. (582 Market Street, San Francisco). Tickets cost $15.00. “Usually a great lineup of comedians, I've seen a few of them around the city and East Bay for years now. Always a great show, definitely recommend.” – Maxfield A., Yelp


 
For Fashionistas: San Francisco Fashion Week is continuing with its VR Style Night Out on Thursday, Sept. 29 from 6 p.m. to 8:30 p.m. (535 Mission Street, 14th Floor, San Francisco). A special guest presentation from Neha Singh (Obsess founder) will give attendees insight into how virtual reality is impacting the fashion world. Tickets start at $15.
 
For Social Media Professionals: The Social Media Strategies Summit will be hosted in San Francisco from Tuesday, Sept. 27 to Thursday, Sept. 29 (609 Sutter St, San Francisco). Some of the speakers include Miri Rodriguez (Microsoft), Jessica Williams (Visa) and Julian Aldridge (Charles Schwab). General summit passes for Sept. 28 and Sept. 29 are $1999.00.
CRIME ROUND-UP
Two 28-year-old men were assaulted at Sunday’s Folsom Street Fair, a leather-themed street party that celebrates the sub-culture. Neil Frias and Jeff White were visiting from New York. Frias claimed he was hit with pepper spray, while a second man came at him with an aerosolized weapon. Police are now searching for the suspects and any surveillance video that may have captured the incident.
 
Two San Francisco paramedics are accused of having sex in a city-owned ambulance while on duty. The men, who work out of Station 49 in the Bayview District, reportedly took the ambulance for a ride. They allegedly picked up a woman, who had sex with one of the men while the other drove the vehicle. An investigation is under way, and sources say at least one of the men could lose his job.
 
A 19-year-old killed in San Francisco’s Bayview-Hunters Point neighborhood over the weekend was identified this morning. Alejandro Valle had been discovered by police with a gunshot wound to the torso. He later died in the hospital. Police are looking for a group of two men and one woman who may have been involved in the scene.
ON YOUTH FOOTBALL
The Colin Kaepernick protest has spurred some football players to kneel during the national anthem, each for his or her own personal reasons. Now, it’s spreading to young players in the Bay Area.

The varsity football team from Mission High School in San Francisco kneeled together for the national anthem two weeks ago, and it caused quite a stir. Senior Duncan Lau claimed that there was a bombardment of negativity following the move. He had chosen to stand during the protest with a fist in the air to show his solidarity.



“SF Mission High keeps kneeling amid the negativity,” wrote one Twitter user. “Translation: pseudo patriotic adults are upset with teen-power.”

But it isn’t just happening at Mission High. Other grade-school children are being criticized for kneeling in protest with Kaepernick at their own football games. However, not all adults aren’t taking offense to the future generation’s move.

“It’s about the way you make your voice heard,” said one football coach. “It doesn’t have to be violent. You can make your voice heard in a peaceful way and speak loud and clear.”
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