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Inside Seattle

Inside Seattle (Apr 30th, 2019)

Hello fellow Seattleites, I’m Nick, your local writer at Inside.com. On behalf of our publication, I want to thank you for being a subscriber. I recently launched the Inside Seattle newsletter to bring you the top stories from around the Emerald City and throughout the Pacific Northwest. I see that you recently took a look at one the Inside Seattle newsletters, which is why I’d like to personally invite you to join the newsletter. Please feel free to send me any interesting news you would like to see covered in this newsletter. You can reach me directly at Nick.Shekeryk@Inside.com. I look forward to adding exciting local news to your inbox each week! — Nick Shekeryk

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  Wednesday and Thursday will have sun breaks through partial clouds, with a 2-day high/low of 65/45 degrees Fahrenheit. 

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1. Investigators said the cause of the crane that fell and killed four people in South Lake Union on Saturday was most likely the result of human error. Upon reviewing the video of the accident, in which a construction crane fell on a Google building before plummeting onto several vehicles below, South Carolina crane accident investigator Tom Barth said ironworkers failed to follow manufacturer directions about crane disassembly. Among those killed were two ironworkers, a former city of Seattle official, and a young college student, whose car was crushed by the crane. – USA TODAY

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2. State Legislature ended its 105-day lawmaking session on Sunday at midnight with the signing of many bills, including raising the state smoking age minimum to 21 years, and the approval of the nation’s first publicly-funded long-term care program. Despite the agreement on legislation, lawmakers could not settle the budget negations detailed in the 2-year, $52.4 billion proposal, which is yet to be determined. – SEATTLE PI

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3. The owners of the Showbox and the Seattle City Council are in talks to reach an agreement to keep the historic venue open for another six months. Last year the family who owns the building sued the city for $40 million after claiming that a temporary rezoning law dramatically decreased their property value upon the announcement that the building would be torn down to make way for a 44-story apartment building to accommodate Seattle’s booming tech influx. City council also unanimously voted to make the venue a historic site. – MY NORTHWEST

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4. A measles outbreak that infected 73 people throughout southern Washington has finally been declared over. The outbreak, which started in January, cost Clark County $864,679 and 12,684 hours in public health staffing to contain and end the epidemic. Officials from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention officials said this year’s measles outbreak, which has infected over 700 people across the nation, is the strongest it’s been in 25 years. – CNBC

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5. The city of Seattle hired three new outreach workers to to help confront and solve the growing homeless epidemic. The workers were paid a combined $244,000 salary for a contract goes through the end of the year, with possible performenace-based extensions. - MY NORTHWEST

6. Washington has mostly decided to send juvenile defenders to state-run educational institutions instead of jail, but there has not been an increase in funding for such institutions in 20 years. This highly overlooked system is causing issues, as the underfunded and understaffed institutions cannot adequately accommodate the increased matriculation of juvenile defenders. – SEATTLE TIMES

7. The local voter turnout for the 2018 midterm elections was among the highest in decades, though its mostly thanks to senior citizens, as 80 percent of voters 65 and overcasted their vote. Less than 40 percent of voters under 30 cast their ballot. – THE STRANGER

8. The Seattle Department of Transportation is working with local restaurants to improve the city’s outdoor dining experience. The SDOT is looking into sidewalk seating that doesn’t require fencing. – EATER SEATTLE

9. Former President Bill Clinton and his wife, former Secretary of State, Hillary Rodham Clinton, will be in Seattle this weekend for a “one-of-a-kind” conversation.  "An Evening with The Clintons" will take place Friday night at the Wamu Theater. - SEATTLE TIMES

10. The Seattle Police Department is gearing up for the 20th annual May Day March for the Rights of Immigrants and Workers to take place downtown on Wednesday. The peaceful protest is usually proceeded by self-proclaimed anarchists who attempt to riot and cause chaos. SPD said the event would be “super well-staffed.” – MY NORTHWEST

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Nick Shekeryk has a professional background rich in digital marketing and media. His work has appeared in The Seattle Times, Seattle Post-Intelligencer, New York Post, The Post-Standard, and on MSN.com, among others. He has a graduate degree in journalism from Syracuse University, as well as creative writing and philosophy degrees from Seattle University. He lives in Seattle, WA, and spends his spare time playing and coaching baseball, running half marathons, and seeing as much live music as possible. You can follow Nick on Twitter at @NickShekeryk.

Editing team: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside); Susmita Baral (senior editor at Inside, who runs the biggest mac and cheese account on Instagram); and David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology).

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