Inside | Real news, curated by real humans
Inside Space

Inside Space (Mar 1st, 2018)

A new weather satellite set to launch today will provide NOAA with detailed maps and data for California and the western United States. A two-hour window opens at 5:02 p.m. for the launch of the GOES-S satellite. It will launch from the United Launch Alliance’s Atlas V rocket. Once operational — in about six months — the satellite will be able to give firefighters more information when fighting wildfires in California. NASA will stream the launch live. — ORLANDO SENTINEL

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

NASA's Curiosity rover drilled into the surface of Mars for the first time in over a year on Monday. The spacecraft dug a hole 0.5 inches deep using a new technique. The test dig was part of a 15-month period engineers have spent trying to get the rover's drill working again. Prior to its breakdown, the drill dug down 2.5 inches to collect samples. Since landing in August 2012, the rover has collected 15 samples. — SPACE

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

An asteroid the size of a bus will fly by Earth on March 2, and another is on its way. Astronomers first discovered the asteroid — known as 2018 DV1 — on Feb. 26. It is expected to come within 70,000 miles of Earth. On March 7, an asteroid — labeled as "potentially dangerous" due to its size and flyby distance — will pass by Earth. That asteroid is known as 2017 VR12 and carries the label from NASA because it is 492 to 1,542 feet wide and will be within 870,000 miles. NASA classifies any asteroid larger than 492 feet and within a distance of 4.6 million miles as a threat. An asteroid known as 2018 DU flew about 196,000 miles from Earth on Feb. 25. — SPACE

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

In response to President Trump's proposed budget cuts, NASA will end a deep space exploration program. The Space Technology Mission Directorate will be merged into NASA's "Exploration" program that seeks to manage the development of deep space hardware. Emails obtained by Ars show the transition already is happening. The news worries some former NASA officials, such as Mason Peck, who tweeted, "Disastrous news!" — ARS TECHNICA

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

"Groundbreaking" new research suggests the earliest stars in the universe began forming 180 million years after the Big Bang. Astronomers used radio waves, as telescopes aren't able to see that far back. Radio waves were collected by an antenna in the Australian desert as part of their 12-year study. The findings could show more about the early stages of the universe and shed more light on the mysterious dark matter. — THE VERGE

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

Calling the Moon? Hold the phone.

On Tuesday, we told you about a plan to put a 4G network on the Moon. Vodafone Germany, Nokia and Audi are working to create the phone network on the Moon that would enable high-def streaming back to Earth.

Well, it might be difficult to do, as the New York Times explains.

  • Email gray
  • Permalink gray

Subscribe to Inside Space

MORE NEWSLETTERS

For those in the business of buying, selling, and developing real estate.

Inside Real Estate

For those in the business of buying, selling, and developing real estate.

DAILY
For those in the business of buying, selling, and developing real estate.

Inside Real Estate

DAILY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via

A thoughtful roundup of news and links for developers

Inside Dev

A thoughtful roundup of news and links for developers

DAILY
A thoughtful roundup of news and links for developers

Inside Dev

DAILY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via

Electric vehicles, self-driving automobiles, smart cars and the world of 21st century transportation

Inside Automotive

Electric vehicles, self-driving automobiles, smart cars and the world of 21st century transportation

TWICE WEEKLY
Electric vehicles, self-driving automobiles, smart cars and the world of 21st century transportation

Inside Automotive

TWICE WEEKLY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via

David Strom's in-depth cybersecurity news and analysis

Inside Security

David Strom's in-depth cybersecurity news and analysis

TWICE WEEKLY
David Strom's in-depth cybersecurity news and analysis

Inside Security

TWICE WEEKLY

SUBSCRIBED!

Share via