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Inside Wine (Mar 15th, 2019)

1. Florida is considering new legislation that will allow small craft distilleries and wineries to ship direct to consumers. Producers say it will greatly benefit their business as they are seeing a rise in tourism and an interest in their products. They also hope it will help grow Florida’s agricultural sector and allow for the creation of Florida sugar cane rum, or whiskey made from Florida-grown grains. Retailers, however, say it would be an unfair advantage to the distilleries as they can’t ship over state lines. — WLRN

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2. Vineyards in the Sierra Foothills of California are covered in over a foot of snow. Winemakers don’t worry about the cold stuff as long as it doesn’t last too long into spring; Kevin Jones of Lava Cap Winery says it protects the vines during their dormancy period. Colder temps also mean pests leave the vineyards alone, and the water produced from melt is welcome in a region that spent years plagued by drought. — SAN FRANCISCO CHRONICLE

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3. A new bill presented by Texas lawmakers proposed that wines labeled "Texas Wine" must contain 100% Texas grapes. A similar bill was presented back in 2017, but was defeated. This time around the legislation includes a provision that allows a 5-year grace period so wineries can make adjustments to meet these new requirements. — TEXAS WINE GROWERS

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4. Wine Intelligence’s 2019 Global Wine Power Index report found that people’s reliance on their smart phones means they don’t recall brands easily. Information can be quickly obtained though technology, meaning people feel less of a need to learn details about a label. The report also found that people are aware of fewer brands overall, even but the ones that do resonate often feature bold imagery and branding. — THE DRINKS BUSINESS

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In Your Glass: Gundlach Bundschu, Cabernet Sauvignon, Sonoma Valley, CA, 2015

As I’m on my way to Germany (anyone else heading to Prowein?) and knowing that there is a lot of white wine in my future, a glass of a bold red seemed like a proper sendoff.

I love some of GunBun’s badass details. The label is fairly clean and elegant, but the cork has whimsical icons  — a gun, a lock, a bread bun, and a shoe — that spell out… well, I’m sure you can figure it out. Their packing tape also carries these images (how they get away with putting an image of a gun on a box I’ll never know).

Sonoma Valley’s cooler climate means Cabernet ripens slower and can develop great acidity, which was quite apparent in this delectable red. Ripe plum, raspberry, and blueberry were immediately apparent on the nose, followed by mocha and sweet baking spices. Black pepper and soft, worn leather also came through. While drinking the wine, the fruits seemed denser and more concentrated, almost like a pie filling. There was great body and structure but still a finesse. A long, lengthy finish had me reaching to take another sip.

The Basics

Wine: Cabernet Sauvignon, Sonoma Valley

Winery: Gundlach Bundschu

Vintage: 2015

Average Price: $55

Find it here

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5. Tea is often used to explain the sensation of tannins to new drinkers, but the two beverages have more in common than simply mouthfeel. A visit to a Sri Lankan tea farm prompted one writer to draw parallels between the beverages, from fieldwork to processing the raw materials. — THE BUYER

6. In layman’s terms, Bon Appetit explains what room temperature means for wine and why it’s worth the extra step to make sure it’s served properly. — BON APPETIT

7. The Sazarac museum in New Orleans, slated to open in the fall, will highlight NOLA spirits brands. The building, which will also house Sazerac's offices, expects to welcome 100,000 guests in its first year. — NEW ORLEANS CITY BUSINESS

8. Welch’s Global Ingredients Group has developed technology, in partnership with Cornell University and the New York Wine and Grape Foundation, that neutralizes aromas and flavors in Concord grapes. They claim this neutral liquid can be used as a base or a blender and help winemakers lower costs. As someone who grew up with a juice box of grape juice in my lunch every day, this is blowing my mind. — WINE BUSINESS

9. Wednesday marked Riesling’s 584th birthday. In honor of this milestone(?), Wine Spectator pays homage to this versatile, but often maligned, grape. — WINE SPECTATOR

10. At this week’s Women of the Vine & Spirits Global Symposium, women on the wholesale side of the business shared their strategies for success. Challenging oneself and getting comfortable with being uncomfortable were two key pieces of advice shared by panelists. — SEVENFIFTY DAILY

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Inside Wine is written and curated by Shana Clarke. Shana is a freelance journalist and regularly contributes to a variety of consumer and trade publications, including Wine Enthusiast, Playboy, HuffPost, USA Today’s Eat Sip Trip, and SevenFifty Daily, among others. Follow her on Instagram at @ShanaSpeaksWine and see more of her work on www.shanaspeakswine.com.

Editing team: Kim Lyons (Pittsburgh-based journalist and managing editor at Inside); Susmita Baral (senior editor at Inside, who runs the biggest mac and cheese account on Instagram); and David Stegon (senior editor at Inside, whose reporting experience includes cryptocurrency and technology).

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